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  1. Standard member RSMA1234
    The Guvnor....!!!!
    20 May '08 12:08
    Can Sun Tzu be applied to chess ?
  2. Standard member Hindstein
    Finish Him!!!
    20 May '08 13:21
    Originally posted by RSMA1234
    Can Sun Tzu be applied to chess ?
    Why don't you ask him?

    User 245225
  3. Standard member RSMA1234
    The Guvnor....!!!!
    20 May '08 14:10 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Hindstein
    Why don't you ask him?

    User 245225
    Thanks dude.

    Will give the "art of War" a try

    PS - Like the mortal Kombat stuff by the way
  4. 22 May '08 19:03
    Originally posted by RSMA1234
    Can Sun Tzu be applied to chess ?
    yes you can.
    however you need to be an advanced chess player and then know yourself very well.
  5. 22 May '08 20:08
    Originally posted by RSMA1234
    Can Sun Tzu be applied to chess ?
    Many of the concepts of The Art of War are extremely relevant to chess. The obvious one is recognising and putting pressure on your enemy's weak points.

    Another interesting point Sun Tzu addresses is handling changing circumstances. In chess you might consider the situation when most of the pawns and material are exchanged and gradually the rooks become more important and the king itself comes out of hiding to become an active attacker. It's important to recognise when the game calls for a change of plan and not carry on blindly with your old one.
  6. 23 May '08 02:44
    There is another Sun Tsu verse or two that applies very well to high level chess ...
    If you know yourself, but not your enemy, you will win only half the time. If you don't know yourself, or your enemy, you are doomed to fail. Only when you know yourself and your enemy will you win all the time.
    I don't think I got it exact, but that is the essence.
    If your opponent does not like open positions, play an open game that you know well, and stuff like that.
    Many elements of Sun Tsu can't be applied to chess because chess is played on a fixed playing field.
  7. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    23 May '08 03:25
    why try to apply ancient texts on military strategy to chess, when you could study chess directly?
  8. 23 May '08 11:53
    Originally posted by wormwood
    why try to apply ancient texts on military strategy to chess, when you could study chess directly?
    Because The Art of War is a fascinating book in its own right. Also it's fun to play chess as if it's a real battle between two equally matched armies, with only the skill of their generals to differentiate them.
  9. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    23 May '08 16:26
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    Because The Art of War is a fascinating book in its own right. Also it's fun to play chess as if it's a real battle between two equally matched armies, with only the skill of their generals to differentiate them.
    well I can understand that, but it still seems so... backwards. I mean, why hit a nail with a screwdriver, albeit a heavy one, when you could use a hammer instead.

    I'm sure even sun tzu has something to say along those lines.