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  1. Standard member HomerJSimpson
    Renouned Grob Killer
    08 Jan '06 20:55
    Im currently reading Winning Chess Tactics by Yasser Seirawan, its a good book, Im almost done reading, does anyone know of anything thats a little more advanced?
  2. Standard member pythagoras
    The mathlete.
    08 Jan '06 21:25
    Originally posted by HomerJSimpson
    Im currently reading Winning Chess Tactics by Yasser Seirawan, its a good book, Im almost done reading, does anyone know of anything thats a little more advanced?
    Yes I do. 'Killer Chess Tactics' by Raymond Keene, Eric Schiller and Leonid Shamkovitch. It cost me $55 Australian Dollars. It takes you through all the tactics and most of them are so complicated that you have to play through the examples on a chess board. It also has advanced chess problems to solve. That is the first half of the book. The second half is about combinations.
    pythagoras.
  3. Standard member Wibble Wobble
    Action barbie
    08 Jan '06 21:32
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1580420761/qid=1136755877/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl/026-4510506-5147617
  4. Standard member HomerJSimpson
    Renouned Grob Killer
    04 Feb '06 03:01
    Originally posted by pythagoras
    Yes I do. 'Killer Chess Tactics' by Raymond Keene, Eric Schiller and Leonid Shamkovitch. It cost me $55 Australian Dollars. It takes you through all the tactics and most of them are so complicated that you have to play through the examples on a chess board. It also has advanced chess problems to solve. That is the first half of the book. The second half is about combinations.
    pythagoras.
    does anyone else have anything else in mind? I looked on amazon and two people gave it horrible reviews
  5. 04 Feb '06 03:51
    Originally posted by HomerJSimpson
    does anyone else have anything else in mind? I looked on amazon and two people gave it horrible reviews
    Mastering Chess Tactics by Neil McDonald.
  6. 04 Feb '06 04:07
    Originally posted by HomerJSimpson
    Im currently reading Winning Chess Tactics by Yasser Seirawan, its a good book, Im almost done reading, does anyone know of anything thats a little more advanced?
    Seirawan's book is intended to explain the fundamental tactical themes every chess player must know if they hope to become better players, and it does a darn good job of it. It does little (some, but not much) to directly develop the tactical ability that will directly benefit you when actually playing. If I could relate it to someone who is trying to learn piano, it is like a theory book that explains the notes, scales and whatnot which you'll need to know, but does little to develop your ability to actually play. For that you'll need to practice. The most efficient way to apply this to chess tactics is to start doing problems regularly. It's not a more advanced book that you need right now, it's a different kind of book (or software if you prefer). To learn chess tactics simply by moving from an explanation of the basic themes to something more advanced would be like trying to learn piano by moving from basic to advanced theory without ever touching the keyboard. Advanced tactics are just more complex combinations of the basic themes explained in WCT. Until recognizing those themes becomes like second nature to you there is little point attempting advanced tactics. Before you move on to Mozart you should have "Mary Had a Little Lamb" nailed.
  7. Standard member HomerJSimpson
    Renouned Grob Killer
    04 Feb '06 04:13
    Originally posted by Skorj
    Seirawan's book is intended to explain the fundamental tactical themes every chess player must know if they hope to become better players, and it does a darn good job of it. It does little (some, but not much) to directly develop the tactical ability that will directly benefit you when actually playing. If I could relate it to someone who is trying to learn pi ...[text shortened]... ed tactics. Before you move on to Mozart you should have "Mary Had a Little Lamb" nailed.
    Good Posting, so you suggest just doing more problems? And thanks for the other poster for the Neil McDonald book.
  8. 04 Feb '06 04:38
    I did the lamaza thing to practise my tactics better. I'm sure everyone on here has heard about it and been tired with it being mentioned over and over.

    I don't suggest anyone to go through this. Instead find a nice collection of tactic puzzles, Ct-art 3.0 is great $35 I believe with 1200 problems it's a cd.

    Anyways take this collection and do 10 problem everyday in your head and then check the answer after and use a board if you have to.
  9. 04 Feb '06 05:47
    Originally posted by HomerJSimpson
    Good Posting, so you suggest just doing more problems? And thanks for the other poster for the Neil McDonald book.
    Yes, and I agree with RahimK's post before this one. If you'd like a book instead of software I am using "The Ultimate Chess Puzzle Book" by Emms. It starts basic and gradually gets harder as you go through the 1000 problems. Dan Heisman recommends a book which I believe is called "Chess Tactics for Students". I'm unfamiliar with it, but usually like what Dan has to say.
    BTW, if you're interested in the de la Maza thing you can find his article "400 Points in 400 Days" for free at
    http://www.masschess.org/Chess_Horizons/Articles/2001-01_Sample_400_Points_Part_1.pdf
    It contains all the essential ideas in his book. If you stick with the basic idea of practicing by doing lots of puzzles, though, you can't go wrong.
  10. 04 Feb '06 08:16
    Chess Tactics For The Tournament Player by Lev Alburt would be ideal for you.
  11. 04 Feb '06 11:47
    Cadogen published a small book named "Attack with Mikhail Tahl" by Tahl & Damsky that is packed with combinations based on typical situations....K in the center (like N sacs on e6), castled K, etc.
  12. Standard member HomerJSimpson
    Renouned Grob Killer
    06 Feb '06 22:22
    Thanks everyone for the help
  13. 07 Feb '06 10:43
    Originally posted by RahimK
    I did the lamaza thing to practise my tactics better...

    I don't suggest anyone to go through this. Instead find a nice collection of tactic puzzles...
    I have the BIG book "CHESS: 5,334 Problems, Combinations, and Games" by Polgar. Would any of you recommend that as a solution to what RahimK's recommended? Or is it no good for whatever reason(s)?

    --
    Brent
  14. 07 Feb '06 10:47
    Originally posted by RahimK
    I did the lamaza thing to practise my tactics better. I don't suggest anyone to go through this...
    Why would you suggest nobody go through this, RahimK?

    Thanks in advance.
  15. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    07 Feb '06 15:15
    Originally posted by magnublm
    I have the BIG book "CHESS: 5,334 Problems, Combinations, and Games" by Polgar. Would any of you recommend that as a solution to what RahimK's recommended? Or is it no good for whatever reason(s)?

    --
    Brent
    Polgar's book is good, but the problems are mostly composed, and nearly all end in checkmate. The section featuring games of the Polgar sisters is the exception.

    Tactics collections from real games that use checkmate threats and other tactical motifs to reach a winning endgame may be more practical.

    Most knowledgeable chess readers recommend avoiding all books by Eric Schiller and Raymond Keene