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  1. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    17 Apr '11 01:04
    Hi folks,

    While doing some work on one of my games, I found this game from 1903 with (of all people) Siegbert Tarrasch as black!

    If someone had posted this game on the forum and asked to guess the player of the black pieces, he might well be the last famous player I would think of.

    Enjoy!

  2. Standard member Quirke
    Racing Ralph
    17 Apr '11 03:51
    It seems the good Doctor was interested in the Accelerated Dragon. I found a game with Mieses as well. Mieses wasn't quite so unsubtle, but the same 0-1 result. In 1912 The two played the Accelerated Dragon again (Tarrasch's only other time in my database), Mieses deviated on move 7, but lost again.
  3. 17 Apr '11 03:57
    Check out Taubenhaus-Tarrasch, Hamburg 1885, if you really want to be amazed.
  4. 17 Apr '11 13:25 / 1 edit
    I cannot see why everyone is so amazed!
    I do wish some of you would take a suggestion from Kramnik
    and study the games history.

    Some of you think chess started when Fritz 1 was first plugged in.

    I'm not having go at you Paul but the general punters.
    Tarrasch's Best Games was going for £6.00 at the Edinburgh Congress.
    I could get none of the gimps to take it. They were gathered around the
    opening books like flies round dung.
    Eventually one lad appeared said "Wow!" paid his £6.00 and went off as happy as Larry.

    Englisch v Tarrasch 1880?'s


    Recognise it? (Tarrasch lost, if he had won...who knows this may have
    been called today the Tarrasch...good game by way.)

    Tarrasch has suffered terribly from the English press.
    It took nearly 100 years to get his 333 games translated into English.
    His acknoweldged masterpiece (on the continent anyway)
    Die moderne Schachpartie is still waiting....

    Yet gormless opening crap and similiar pure pile is churned out every month
    to an eager public who think spending $14.95 is going to buy them grading points.

    Tarrasch's bad PR possibly stems from his notes when he beat Blackburne.
    Translated they appear gloating. Not the done thing in Victorian times
    where it was often considered bad form to print a losers name.

    He played some wonderful instructive games. He played as if he was standing
    in front of a demo board showing a class how it should be done.

    Don't forget he was an amatuer player, he never gave up his medical practice.
    His one piece of bad luck was being born in the same era as Lasker.

    His games and notes sprinkle with humour and studying them certainly
    gives the player a bunk up.

    Fischer's first real chess book was 'Tarrasch's Best Games.' (Brady).

    He is without doubt the most misunderstood and under rated of all
    the games greatest players. Yet his games are there just waiting to read
    understood and enjoyed.

    Lifted from Wiki,

    "He was a great target of the hypermodern school, led by Richard Réti, Aron
    Nimzowitsch, and Savielly Tartakower, all of whom criticized his ideas as dogmatic.

    However, many modern masters regard Tarrasch's actual play as not dogmatic.
    For example, Tarrasch annotated his victory on the Black side of the Advance
    French against Paulsen (Nuremberg 1888):

    1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Qb6 6. Bd3 cxd4 (Tarrasch gives this
    an exclamation mark, and points out that 6 ... Bd7 allows 7. dxc5 with a good
    game. However, most accounts credit Nimzovitch with such anti-dogmatic
    hypermodern inventiveness when he played 7. dxc5 against Gersz Salwe
    almost a quarter of a century later."

    Two games to whet the appetite. Played 52 years apart.
    He loved the game.

    Tarrasch - Pribulsky Berlin, 1880



    And when Tarrasch was 70 year old.

    Amateur - Tarrasch
    Munich -, 1932



    The Famous Blackburne Game

    Amatuer - Blackburne 1880



    For those of you have never seen these games before and are
    sitting there with your jaw in your lap....Go forth and study the games history.
  5. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    17 Apr '11 23:44
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    I cannot see why everyone is so amazed!
    I do wish some of you would take a suggestion from Kramnik
    and study the games history.

    Some of you think chess started when Fritz 1 was first plugged in.

    I'm not having go at you Paul but the general punters.
    Tarrasch's Best Games was going for £6.00 at the Edinburgh Congress.
    I could get none of the gim ...[text shortened]... sitting there with your jaw in your lap....Go forth and study the games history.
    Thanks for giving me a break! 🙂

    For a little bit of back story, I like to use the "reference" section of chessbase to find games with a position, because I often find games that don't pop up in the "opening book" part. I also use it to go beyond the stats, because I know many of the Grandmaster's styles, and I like to see who favors what, and how they follow up.

    I tend to rearrange the columns by rating so that I can see what the strongest guys think of the position, but none of the old masters have ratings, so I scroll through the "non-rated" part of the selection to see what some of the "classic" guys play.

    I make a meal out of some of the gems I find there. For instance, I play the KIA OTB, but when black plays the New York System (think London reversed), I transpose to a Reti with c4.

    The line I play is based on Reti-Yates, 1924, and Keene's Flank Openings, gives the game where Keene shows how Yates could have equalized with a great game.

    I play the line anyway, and in 27 OTB games (4 against experts), black has never come close to playing the correct move, or really even coming close to Yates. One of these days someone is going to put me down with correct play, but until it happens I'm going to keep dancing with the date I brought to the ball!
  6. 18 Apr '11 11:39
    Hi Paul

    You are preaching to the converted.
    (except I give examples) 😉

    My rep was based soley on playing 'not so good lines'
    banking on the fact my opponent would not know
    or would not find the ref over the board.

    I used to ignore the main lines in books.
    You are looking for a note that says something like:

    "White/Black got a lot of play for the pawn/piece but lost in...."
    and then mention a GM v GM game. (no moves, just the fact it was GM v GM).

    If I have a lot of play v an under 2000 then I win.
    I won't be playing be playing any GM's.

    OK so it's bad at their level... at my level I'll risk it.

    The wise words of Rowson from Zebra's.....

    "Wilfully playing an opening in which you know
    you should be worse with best play is tautamount
    to walking around with a culable character defect."


    Hey! I got a culable character defect!!!

    I spied a small note in Estrin's Two Knights on the Max Lange bit.

    Here....White to play.


    The mainline is 8.Re1+ but tucked away in the note.
    8.fxg7 Rg8 9.Bg5 is best answered by 9...Be7 10.Bxe7 Kxe7!


    So I reckoned, as with a lot of my opening prep.
    Whose is going to play that if they have not seen it before?

    (Having a total disrespect for your opponents ability
    is paramount in a swindler's trapper's locker and why not?
    Every game that has been won or lost must have at least one blunder.
    Nobody is perfect. Your job is not to play the last blunder.)

    So I scored well with that trick/trap because nobody played 9...Be7.
    All moved their Queen.

    Lost count of the blitz games I've had this.


    9...Qd5 10.Nc3 Qd6 11.Ne4


    Oh Happy Days...the board is covered with tricks and traps.

    Ice Cold on here has speared a few guys on here with it.
    Here where you have days to move and consult the opening books.

    He caught Cheshire Cat with it twice in the same year.

    Ice Cold - Cheshire Cat RHP 2006




    Ice Cold - Cheshire Cat RHP 2006



    This next is a super example and merges nicely with
    the bit about doubled pawns from another thread.

    lexo -v- meule RHP 2005



    Rowson's Zebra's is an excellent book.
    Plenty of face slapping for the likes of me in there.

    If only he had written 25 years earlier....
  7. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    18 Apr '11 13:13
    From the 1.d4 side of things, it has been known for 40 years or so the proper way to defend against the minority attack in the Carlsbad variation of the QGD.

    (requisite position picture)


    (the idea is to advance b4 b5 and create a weakness on c6 to attack.)

    Needless to say this has fallen out of GM praxis, but I find consistently that this and the Botvinnik pawn center variation score extremely well at the sub 1800-2000 level as my opponents don't know the proper technique or plans.
  8. 18 Apr '11 13:55 / 1 edit
    Good to see the (requisite position picture) .

    But need an example. Just one will do.

    Diagram showing the idea, diagram showing idea in action.
    Diagram with completed plan. Show full game.

    It's not use asking me. I've never played a Mino Attack in my life.

    Edit 1: And it must be one your games.
  9. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    20 Apr '11 01:33 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Hi Paul

    You are preaching to the converted.
    (except I give examples) 😉

    My rep was based soley on playing 'not so good lines'
    banking on the fact my opponent would not know
    or would not find the ref over the board.

    I used to ignore the main lines in books.
    You are looking for a note that says something like:

    "White/Black got a lot of play for the likes of me in there.

    If only he had written 25 years earlier....
    I thought my OP was a ...sample...

    And I'm not giving away my Reti line until I'm done with it!