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  1. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    12 Feb '11 03:12
    http://www.thailandlife.com/thai-culture/how-to-play-thai-chess.html

    An interesting age old game that, if mastered, can certainly venture world chess to new levels. Imagine having a Bishop can only move one square.

    You are limited, but step by step mentally, you can develop thoughts of where he could really go in world chess. Play the game, then extend it yourself to 2 moves per piece, then 3 moves per piece.

    Simplicity extended to complexity in a logical way!

    -m.
  2. Standard member hedonist
    peacedog's keeper
    12 Feb '11 23:12
    Originally posted by mikelom
    http://www.thailandlife.com/thai-culture/how-to-play-thai-chess.html

    An interesting age old game that, if mastered, can certainly venture world chess to new levels. Imagine having a Bishop can only move one square.

    You are limited, but step by step mentally, you can develop thoughts of where he could really go in world chess. Play the game, then extend ...[text shortened]... per piece, then 3 moves per piece.

    Simplicity extended to complexity in a logical way!

    -m.
    Try Go.

    The thinking mans Connect Four.

    More basic than chess but deeper, so they say.
  3. 13 Feb '11 01:50
    Originally posted by hedonist
    Try Go.

    The thinking mans Connect Four.

    More basic than chess but deeper, so they say.
    if one likes chess, one can learn a lot from go. but i doubt, "correspondence go" is feasible.
  4. Standard member hedonist
    peacedog's keeper
    13 Feb '11 05:09
    Originally posted by tharkesh
    if one likes chess, one can learn a lot from go. but i doubt, "correspondence go" is feasible.
    Why is that?
  5. 13 Feb '11 05:19
    Originally posted by tharkesh
    if one likes chess, one can learn a lot from go. but i doubt, "correspondence go" is feasible.
    itsyourturn.com has corr. go as well as other games in a turn based format. Never played there though so I can't give a review.
  6. Donation ketchuplover
    G.O.A.T.
    13 Feb '11 10:18
    Originally posted by KneeCaps
    itsyourturn.com has corr. go as well as other games in a turn based format. Never played there though so I can't give a review.
    They use(d) to have forums there but not anymore.
  7. 14 Feb '11 13:02
    Originally posted by hedonist
    Why is that?
    i would expect go to last too long. in chess, the average number of moves per game is estimated to be ~37, go ranges from 150-250, almost never below 50.

    or did you ask about the 'one can learn a lot from it as a chess-player' part?
  8. Standard member hedonist
    peacedog's keeper
    14 Feb '11 20:11
    Originally posted by tharkesh
    i would expect go to last too long. in chess, the average number of moves per game is estimated to be ~37, go ranges from 150-250, almost never below 50.

    or did you ask about the 'one can learn a lot from it as a chess-player' part?
    Yeh the correspondence Go thing was what I was asking about. Suppose the amount of moves may be the reason.

    Not sure about it helping your chess. Though I guess a good chess player would make a good Go player if they put their mind to it.
  9. 14 Feb '11 21:17 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by hedonist
    Yeh the correspondence Go thing was what I was asking about. Suppose the amount of moves may be the reason.

    Not sure about it helping your chess. Though I guess a good chess player would make a good Go player if they put their mind to it.
    hm, i believe in most things helping to understand chess better. game tactics, pattern recognition, the player you play with...

    go in particular is mind-boggling for someone who only knew about chess before. the basic outline is so similar (a grid of black and white, two players, etc.) and yet the outcome is so different (playing on the edges, all stones are equal, conquer space not kings, different player strengths are balanced etc.).

    the nicest was to learn the give and take. in go you can never have everything, you must allow your opponent to gain space. it has a lot to do with recognizing the ability of the other player (i hardly finish go games to the end, resigning a game means you acknowledge the strength of the other and assume he doesnt blunder, which is not nice to make someone do). and this give and take is also essential for chess: give a pawn, a piece, take a tempo.

    using the balance to create unbalance.

    or so.

    anyways, is fascinating. 🙂
  10. 14 Feb '11 21:53
    Is Go beyond computer domination yet?
  11. 14 Feb '11 22:05
    Originally posted by tonytiger41
    Is Go beyond computer domination yet?
    yes, even further than chess. but it is deterministic, so by time it will be solved...

    even though it is extremely popular in some parts of the world, i doubt there will ever be a game 'human vs computer' in go, the last frontier of human 'creativity', as has been done some time ago for chess.