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  1. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    03 Nov '13 18:40 / 4 edits
    Hello- It's been awhile since I left competitive chess, but thought I'd take a break from irritating the political conservatives in the comments section and add a few thoughts on my idea of the perfect chess "system" This 3 part system would give a chessplayer all the tools they need to compete and improve.

    1. A chess App. worth paying for. This app would give a chess player access to all the tools in order to improve one's game including: Access to publications such as New in Chess, Informants as well as most of the major national chess publications around the world, a large openings book, tutorials and test problems on tactics, endgames, positional play, ideas and thoughts behind opening moves and novelities, a compitition section where a player could play against a strong program on 50+ different levels (with a hint key), as well as practical advise for OTB and correspondence players such as setting up an effective playing area, finding the best balance between study and competition, equipment that best suits your needs, game loads, etc. It would be a big task to create an app that would give a chessplayer access to all this with just one click, but if someone did, it would be worth paying for.

    2. The best device for a chessplayer: I think this would be a tablet of some kind. Tablets are not as bulky as a laptop computer, but larger than a device such as a Apple smartphone, and easier to see from a distance. Brand loyalty aside, a tablet gives a chessplayer a device small enough to keep a chess position on to refer to while moving the pieces on a standard chess set, as well as being big enough to see a chess position clearly from accross an average size table.

    3. A good standard size chess set: There are some things technology cannot fully replace, and this is one. Study after study has shown that a chessplayer who makes the effort to physically move pieces on a board will remember the moves longer, and it's no secret that correspondince players that take the time and effort to keep their current chess position in front of them and explore their lines of play on a standard chess set by actually moving the pieces, score far better than those who plan their next move by simply looking at a position on a computer screen or print out. A "good" standard chess set need not be expensive, but should be of the same size as those in OTB tournaments.

    This would be my idea of the perfect 3 part chess system. It's compact, portable, and not very expensive. We already have #2 and #3. Number 1 I think is still still a few years away.

    Thoughts?🙂
  2. Standard member hedonist
    peacedog's keeper
    03 Nov '13 19:15 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by bill718
    Hello- It's been awhile since I left competitive chess, but thought I'd take a break from irritating the political conservatives in the comments section and add a few thoughts on my idea of the perfect chess "system" This 3 part system would give a chessplayer all the tools they need to compete and improve.

    1. A chess App. worth paying for. This app woul ...[text shortened]... . We already have #2 and #3. Number 1 I think is still still a few years away.

    Thoughts?🙂
    All you ask for from number one is available free online from just a few sites. If having to click more than once is so much of a hardship, perhaps you would not have the motivation to make use of the tools even if they were in one place.

    As you mention, studying with a real board and pieces is the best way to learn. So Isn't it logical that going to a real chessclub is best? The internet and programs should just be used to compliment your training.
  3. 03 Nov '13 20:18 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by bill718
    Hello- It's been awhile since I left competitive chess, but thought I'd take a break from irritating the political conservatives in the comments section and add a few thoughts on my idea of the perfect chess "system" This 3 part system would give a chessplayer all the tools they need to compete and improve.

    1. A chess App. worth paying for. This app woul ...[text shortened]... . We already have #2 and #3. Number 1 I think is still still a few years away.

    Thoughts?🙂
    I love my orion 6 in 1 magnetic chess board, it has an ELO of 1400 max, but the best thing about it, it has 100 Fischer games, 100 Karpov games, 100 Kasparov games and 20 deep blue games, you can play over these with a function to guess the move and it gives you a percentage of the correctness of your chioces, the advantages are,

    1. real chess pieces
    2. replay master games
    3. play against the computer (ok 1400's not very strong)
    4. coaching mode
    5. its inexpensive
    6. It has a picture of Anatoly Karpov on the box!

    etc etc

    this I supplement with good quality chess books.
  4. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    03 Nov '13 20:24
    Originally posted by bill718
    Hello- It's been awhile since I left competitive chess, but thought I'd take a break from irritating the political conservatives in the comments section and add a few thoughts on my idea of the perfect chess "system" This 3 part system would give a chessplayer all the tools they need to compete and improve.

    1. A chess App. worth paying for. This app woul ...[text shortened]... . We already have #2 and #3. Number 1 I think is still still a few years away.

    Thoughts?🙂
    I have serious doubts about 3). I think the board is actually easier to view in 2D. This is closer to the true nature of chess. Unless you are playing the Star Trek version, chess pieces only move in two dimensions. 🙂
  5. 03 Nov '13 20:35
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    I have serious doubts about 3). I think the board is actually easier to view in 2D. This is closer to the true nature of chess. Unless you are playing the Star Trek version, chess pieces only move in two dimensions. 🙂
    are you saying that chess is essentially geometric 😲
  6. 03 Nov '13 22:03 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    I love my orion 6 in 1 magnetic chess board, it has an ELO of 1400 max, but the best thing about it, it has 100 Fischer games, 100 Karpov games, 100 Kasparov games and 20 deep blue games, you can play over these with a function to guess the move and it gives you a percentage of the correctness of your chioces, the advantages are,

    1. real chess pi ...[text shortened]... re of Anatoly Karpov on the box!

    etc etc

    this I supplement with good quality chess books.
    Its very lazy but I don't buy as many chess books as I would because I'm lazy in playing through the notation. Publishing them as e books with pgn boards like here where you click through the games would be a big improvement to me.

    I use my computer as an opening book sometimes, press enter through the variations, but I don't like wading through notes I've never been able to picture them that well.
  7. 03 Nov '13 22:26
    Originally posted by e4chris
    Its very lazy but I don't buy as many chess books as I would because I'm lazy in playing through the notation. Publishing them as e books with pgn boards like here where you click through the games would be a big improvement to me.

    I use my computer as an opening book sometimes, press enter through the variations, but I don't like wading through notes I've never been able to picture them that well.
    The advantage of a chess book is that one can if it is well written use it without a chessboard, following the game through diagrams, this aids visualization and forces one to become involved, but i agree, computers have made the process more convenient. Chess books are notoriously dry though, the best are the ones that discuss ideas, the worst are the ones with hordes of variations. Biographies are good as you get an insight into the life and the games of the individual.
  8. 03 Nov '13 22:34
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    The advantage of a chess book is that one can if it is well written use it without a chessboard, following the game through diagrams, this aids visualization and forces one to become involved, but i agree, computers have made the process more convenient. Chess books are notoriously dry though, the best are the ones that discuss ideas, the worst are ...[text shortened]... ions. Biographies are good as you get an insight into the life and the games of the individual.
    I have Alekhine's best games vol 1 found it at a market and I admit I haven't played through a single game, too lazy, but if I could click through them on an e book I would of been through most of them.
  9. Standard member hedonist
    peacedog's keeper
    03 Nov '13 23:29
    Originally posted by e4chris
    I have Alekhine's best games vol 1 found it at a market and I admit I haven't played through a single game, too lazy, but if I could click through them on an e book I would of been through most of them.
    Do they still do chess audiobooks? Baseman was the guy back in the day but maybe I'm just showing my age.

    Anyway if you can still get them, play one when you go to bed and in the morning when you wake up you'll be a GM 😉
  10. 04 Nov '13 00:03
    "....I could click through them on an e book."

    One of the greatest chess books ever written and he wants to click through it.
    That is like buying a Beatles CD and just looking at the cover without
    listening to the music.

    Play over Game 5 on a proper set. Let the moves sink in and hear the music.
    You are seeing what Alekhine and Vidmar saw. Not a cluster of pixels.
    Feel the beat, smell the sweat and experience the shock Vidmar got
    when you play Alekhine's 9th move.

    It's a moment that just blinks past you on a screen.
    You won't feel nothing, no spark.
    You have to get it over the board not through a telly.

    You don't need apps and tablets to enjoy studying the game and improve.
    I can point to all the great players chess BC (before computers).

    These things encourage laziness, (the last lad even admits it.)
    If you think you are really learning anything by watching wee coloured
    graphics flicking past your dull eyes then you are completely deluding yourself.

    Apps. What an awful word to allow to sneak into the vocabulary.

    'Apps'. It's Nethanderal speech.

    Soon books that teach kids to read be will not be 'A for Apple' but 'A for App.'

    Vidmar.
    A book of Vidmar's greatest losses would be most instructive.
    All the great players, Lasker, Tarrasch, Alekhine, Capa, Botvinnik, Smyslov
    have a brilliant win or wins against Vidmar in their 'Best of' collections.
  11. Standard member Exuma
    Anansi
    04 Nov '13 02:27
    I hate to say it GP, but I agree with SG here. I have finally reached the point where I "see" the board better in 2D. A computer screen is where I play the majority of my chess. I do have nostalgia for the real thing, but I don't actually *miss* it. I will give you that the smell of my own stress and fear is missing though :-)
  12. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    04 Nov '13 02:48 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Exuma
    I hate to say it GP, but I agree with SG here. I have finally reached the point where I "see" the board better in 2D. A computer screen is where I play the majority of my chess. I do have nostalgia for the real thing, but I don't actually *miss* it. I will give you that the smell of my own stress and fear is missing though :-)
    I do not think it is a coincidence that the advent of computers and the rise of kids making it to master and higher at earlier ages happened at about the same time.

    I read an interview of Anand recently where he talked about how he uses a computer, and how it has dramatically increased how much he can absorb and learn compared to the older methods.

    He then went on to add that he starts to pull out a board and pieces about a week prior to a tournament or match "to get the feel of the pieces."

    I thought it was a very balanced and enlightening perspective.
  13. 04 Nov '13 06:28 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by e4chris
    I have Alekhine's best games vol 1 found it at a market and I admit I haven't played through a single game, too lazy, but if I could click through them on an e book I would of been through most of them.
    you know for some inexplicable reason he is a player whose games i do not know, Rubinstein is another and Nimzowitsch.
  14. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    04 Nov '13 06:32
    Originally posted by bill718
    Hello- It's been awhile since I left competitive chess, but thought I'd take a break from irritating the political conservatives in the comments section and add a few thoughts on my idea of the perfect chess "system" This 3 part system would give a chessplayer all the tools they need to compete and improve.

    1. A chess App. worth paying for. This app woul ...[text shortened]... . We already have #2 and #3. Number 1 I think is still still a few years away.

    Thoughts?🙂
    I dunno try The A.R.B. Chess System 😞
  15. 04 Nov '13 14:00
    Hi Paul.

    "I do not think it is a coincidence that the advent of computers and the rise of kids
    making it to master and higher at earlier ages happened at about the same time. "

    The good thing about the rise of computers (and it's technology) is the
    rise in people playing chess, especially online.
    The only surprising thing, if the computer teachng was really beneficial
    is where are the hundreds of thousands of other under 14 GM's.
    Where are the thousands of new GM's springing up from every age group
    because computers can make you a better player.

    I know a couple of child prodigies have popped up like they do every decade.

    Also It is far easier these days to make required the norms.
    The obvious being the ease of travel and number of get your 'IM/GM Norms Here'
    tournaments being organised.

    The current system has been abused for years - see my thread where
    they have discovered fake tournaments with fake games resulting in
    players getting fake GM and fake IM titles.
    This rise in the explosion of GM's has brought about the unheard term 'Weak Grandmaster'.

    You can get enough GM norms without ever winning a tournament.
    All you need do is score the required amount of wins.
    This is akin to getting knocked out in 4 semi finals and being given the
    cup because you made 4 semi-finals. It's nonsense.

    If you want a yard stick for measuring a really good chess player
    then select those that have qualified for the World Candidates.

    SInce the death of Alekhine we have 97 and the vast majority in this
    list never used a computer, app or tablet to get there.

    Adams
    Adorján
    Akopian
    Anand
    Aronian
    Averbakh
    Bacrot
    Bareev
    Beliavsky
    Benko
    Boleslavsky
    Botvinnik
    Bronstein
    Byrne
    Carlsen
    Chernin
    Dolmatov
    Dominguez
    Dreev
    Euwe
    Filip
    Fine
    Fischer
    Flohr
    Gelfand
    Geller
    Gligoric
    Grischuk
    Gulko
    Gurevich
    Hjartarson
    Hort
    Hübner
    Ivanchuk
    Ivkov
    Kamsky
    Karpov
    Kasimdzhanov
    Kasparov
    Keres
    Khalifman
    Kharlov
    Korchnoi
    Kotov
    Kramnik
    Larsen
    Lautier
    Leko
    Lilienthal
    Lutz
    Malakhov
    Mecking
    Morozevich
    Movsesian
    Najdorf
    Nikolic
    Nisipeanu
    Nogueiras
    Olafsson
    Panno
    Petrosian
    Pilnik
    Polgar
    Polugaevsky
    Ponomariov
    Portisch
    Radjabov
    Reshevsky
    Ribli
    Romanishin
    Rublevsky
    Salov
    Sax
    Seirawan
    Shirov
    Short
    Smyslov
    Sokolov
    Spassky
    Speelman
    Spraggett
    Ståhlberg
    Stein
    Svidler
    Szabo
    Taimanov
    Tal
    Timman
    Tiviakov
    Tkachiev
    Topalov
    Torre
    Uhlmann
    Vaganian
    Van der Sterren
    Yudasin
    Yusupov