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  1. Subscriber Pianoman1
    Nil desperandum
    08 Jan '18 07:59 / 1 edit
    You're coaching chess to a club player. What are the three most important pieces of advice you would give, and why?
  2. 08 Jan '18 22:35
    If you are playing a stranger in a bar never take en passant.
    (it will cause a 'you are cheating' fight)

    Do not lend out chess books (you won't get them back)

    Always give a check...it might be mate.
  3. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    09 Jan '18 04:27
    Originally posted by @greenpawn34
    If you are playing a stranger in a bar never take en passant.
    (it will cause a 'you are cheating' fight)

    Do not lend out chess books (you won't get them back)

    Always give a check...it might be mate.
    No "check all checks"?
  4. 09 Jan '18 08:14
    Unless you have an access to internet, nowadays. Long ago if I played a stranger I had to discuss about en passant rule to come to term before starting the game.
  5. 09 Jan '18 08:57 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @pianoman1
    You're coaching chess to a club player. What are the three most important pieces of advice you would give, and why?
    1. Check all checks (yours and your opponents' ).
    2. When you've found a good move, don't play it. First look for a better.
    3. Think about every move. No, especially if you've thought the whole line through on your last move and you already know it's forcing.

    And a bonus rule:
    4. Drink beer after the game, not during.
  6. 09 Jan '18 18:35
    Originally posted by @shallow-blue

    And a bonus rule:
    4. Drink beer after the game, not during.[/b]
    4. ensure your opponent is drinking more quickly than you...
  7. Standard member byedidia
    Mister Why
    09 Jan '18 23:33
    1. Check all Checks. (both sides)
    2. Look for Loose Pieces. (both sides)
    3. Be aware of mating threats. (both sides)
  8. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    10 Jan '18 01:43
    1. Before you make your intended move, ask yourself, what is the likely reply?
    2. Know the material point system and always be aware of the material balance.
    3. Strive to be ahead on material.
  9. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    10 Jan '18 07:37
    1. Check all checks (both sides).
    2. Look for pieces en prise (both sides).
    3. Assume that your opponent will make the best move he knows how to.
  10. 10 Jan '18 12:58
    On a more serious note there are no 'Golden Rules' and there are lot more than 3.

    There are some 'Fools Gold' rules.
    Bishops are always better than Knights.
    Doubled or isolated pawns are always bad.
    Rook endings are always drawn.
    Bishops of opposite colour always draw.

    Delete 'always; and insert 'sometimes'. or 'usually, but.....'

    The only rule one could class as 'Golden' is try not to come to the board fatigued.
    But players, due to extenuating circumstances, have had to do this and still won.

    Three standard rules:

    Am I winning or losing? (do I need to unbalance things.)

    That looks like a good move....is there better? (when you start thinking like
    this then you know you are getting better. The sit on your hands technique.)

    Check all Checks (even the silly ones, it could and often has sparked off a sound idea.)

    There are dozens of others, some belong only in the three phases of game. Opening , Middle-Game and Ending
  11. 10 Jan '18 15:47 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @pianoman1
    You're coaching chess to a club player. What are the three most important pieces of advice you would give, and why?
    1. Openings: Learn a little about all the openings, and a great deal about the ones you choose to include in your opening repertoire. Why? It gives a club player the best chance of avoiding opening difficulties without endless hours of book study.

    2. Balance study and playing time: Why? A club player will need both in order to improve.

    3. Always have a strong player critique one's completed tournament games: Why? It will help a club player improve faster by avoiding making the same mistakes over and over.

  12. 10 Jan '18 15:54
    Chess is 90% observation.

    Study the opening and you'll get slightly better middle games. Study the middle game and you'll get winning positions. Study the endgame and you will win games you should win and win/draw games you should have lost. Endgames in chess is like putting is to golf. You could have a 400 yard drive, but if you can't putt, what good is that advantage?

    The will to find a better move is most important aspect of improvement.