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  1. 25 Jul '12 20:22
    I occasionally have the problem of moving too fast and making inaccurate blunders that lead to me losing. Will studying tactics help fix this problem? When I have the opposite problem of moving too slow, I usually study the positional side of things to compensate for that.
  2. Subscriber LittleDonkey
    Little Donkey
    25 Jul '12 21:12
    You've worked out a great combination and start to play it, your opponent falls into your trap and you move instantly just to show him that you had it all planned from the start. It not only shows what a fantastic player you are but probably will attract the one female in the room... and three seconds later you notice that you had missed something and are now staring at a lost game.

    Great combinations don't go away if you play them more slowly but oversights made in your original calculations might.

    Oh and if your opponent is in time trouble (you know what I mean 10 moves to play in 3 minutes) don't play quickly so that he has to think in his own time. They have been in that situation hundreds of times before and probably enjoy it. Play more slowly, take your time that is what it is there for. Most likely they will scrape through to the time control with seconds to spare and because you thought about your moves you will get there unscathed too. If you are lucky he will mess up on the move following the time control as he is so relieved to get there.
  3. 25 Jul '12 22:22
    Originally posted by LittleDonkey
    You've worked out a great combination and start to play it, your opponent falls into your trap and you move instantly just to show him that you had it all planned from the start. It not only shows what a fantastic player you are but probably will attract the one female in the room... and three seconds later you notice that you had missed something and ...[text shortened]... cky he will mess up on the move following the time control as he is so relieved to get there.
    Eh. Apparently, I violated chess principles. Successful tacticians generally make accurate sacrifices with around 80 percent of their time left(sometimes 70 percent, but that's as low as they'll go).

    It is ironic. Due to lack of opening preparation(Who will make 20 moves in 1 minute in a 5/0 game?), it is more practical to play like Karpov in the shorter blitz games then it is to try to play like Tal.
  4. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    26 Jul '12 01:41
    Originally posted by LittleDonkey
    You've worked out a great combination and start to play it, your opponent falls into your trap and you move instantly just to show him that you had it all planned from the start. It not only shows what a fantastic player you are but probably will attract the one female in the room... and three seconds later you notice that you had missed something and ...[text shortened]... cky he will mess up on the move following the time control as he is so relieved to get there.
    You just reminded me of a lose I had in my first chess tournament. I had played a few games at a chess club, but was still unrated at the time. I had lost a couple previous games and was now playing a fairly even game, in which my opponent had gotten into what I thought was time trouble for I had never seen speed chess at that time. I don't remember the exact number of moves he had to play to reach his 40 moves, but his time had just went under a minute. I, being desperate to win a game anyway I could, began using that strategy of moving fast myself, so he had to do all his thinking on his time and there was no such thing as 5 or 3 second delays, since the clocks were all windup analogy back then. I was sure I was going to win on time. But like you said he squeaked through with a few seconds to spare while I had made an inaccurate move in my haste and came out worse and eventually lost the game. I did win my last game however. Now I do not like to win games on time. That is not a good game in my opinion.
  5. 26 Jul '12 02:35
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    You just reminded me of a lose I had in my first chess tournament. I had played a few games at a chess club, but was still unrated at the time. I had lost a couple previous games and was now playing a fairly even game, in which my opponent had gotten into what I thought was time trouble for I had never seen speed chess at that time. I don't remember the ...[text shortened]... game however. Now I do not like to win games on time. That is not a good game in my opinion.
    Do you still have the occasional problem of moving too quickly? Or, do you find yourself more balanced now?

    The idea of using sound mathematical principles in chess to determine if a sacrifice will work or not is a beautiful revelation for me. This just further reinforces my belief that time management is more of an issue for players who prefer playing tactical chess than it is for players who prefer playing positional chess.
  6. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    26 Jul '12 04:22 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by hamworld
    Do you still have the occasional problem of moving too quickly? Or, do you find yourself more balanced now?

    The idea of using sound mathematical principles in chess to determine if a sacrifice will work or not is a beautiful revelation for me. This just further reinforces my belief that time management is more of an issue for players who prefer playing tactical chess than it is for players who prefer playing positional chess.
    Yes, that still happens when I play OTB, because of the time limits enforced. I have a tendency to move quickly in the early opening and in positions that there seems to be an obvious move and I do not feel in danger, in order to save the time for later, especially in the 45 minute or less games.

    P.S. However, I never try to win on time.