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  1. 03 May '08 23:45
    I am reading "Logical chess move by move" and it explains repeatedly that after castling, moving any of the 3 pawns away from the king is a major weakness and should be avoided. Now obviously depending on the situation there are exceptions. My question is: At what point is it considered unnecessary to protect the king with those pawns?
    If it's down to all pawns and maybe a minor piece on each side then in most situations I suppose you would be using your king as a weapon.

    What if you each still have a bishop, knight, and rook? I suppose that you would still want to keep protection in this case. But, where do you draw the line?
    I understand this is a difficult question and every case is different.

    In summary this is a 2 part question:
    A-When do you activate those pawns as weapons?
    B-When do you activate your king as a weapon?
    Obviously I have my own ideas about this but I would appreciate it if I could gain any knowledge from those more experienced then myself.
  2. 03 May '08 23:53 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by CEE DOG
    I am reading "Logical chess move by move" and it explains repeatedly that after castling, moving any of the 3 pawns away from the king is a major weakness and should be avoided. Now obviously depending on the situation there are exceptions. My question is: At what point is it considered unnecessary to protect the king with those pawns?
    If it's down to a ...[text shortened]... I would appreciate it if I could gain any knowledge from those more experienced then myself.
    After the queens are off the board, I don't even bother castling, unless there is a good reason to. It really depends on the position to know when to bring your king out and when to use those pawns. Generally if my opponent has a rook and 2 minor pieces I would activate the king.
  3. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    04 May '08 00:43
    often when the center is blocked (and enemy pieces are obstructed by the blockade) you can storm your king pawns quite safely. but you'll naturally have to have the time (pawns move slowly) and the followthrough with pieces to finish the attack.

    the bottom line is: if your opponent can deliver more pieces to the defense than you have in the attack, you're dead.
  4. 04 May '08 01:02
    Originally posted by CEE DOG
    I am reading "Logical chess move by move" and it explains repeatedly that after castling, moving any of the 3 pawns away from the king is a major weakness and should be avoided. Now obviously depending on the situation there are exceptions. My question is: At what point is it considered unnecessary to protect the king with those pawns?
    If it's down to a ...[text shortened]... I would appreciate it if I could gain any knowledge from those more experienced then myself.
    hi, its a wonderful book, and your question needs some thought as well. The book consistently shows that if the pawns are moved, ie. to break pins etc, mostly h3 if white has castled kingside and h6 if black has followed in a similar fashion can be targeted with sacrifices etc opening up the kings position. consider the dynamics of the position though, is the centre closed, will it remain closed for some time, then is it possible to delay castling in favour of development and initiating a cunning plan. also if the centre is closed and likely to remain so then play will of necessity take place on the wings and therefore moving the pawns in front of the king may be necessary to try for an initiative, for example the kings Indian attack white will generally try to restrict blacks play on the queenside while trying to soften up the kingside and this includes moving the pawns in front of your king, h4-h5-h6 etc, same in the French defence, white may try g4 to get rid of blacks night on f5 and try to fight for some initiative, it really depends on the position, also again if the centre is closed sometimes play centres around trying to break the pawn chains, and usually if there is a rook behind the f pawns, they will be pushed forward to try to open the position or typically the c pawn for black, if this of course is dynamically advantageous. this has been my very limited experience and if it is beneficial to you in anyway, then i will be happy, anyhow, i enjoyed that book immensely and there is even a website with similar games based on mr irvings method http://www.logicalchess.com/ - regards robert.