Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. Standard member onyx2006
    onyx2007
    09 Mar '06 11:23
    Hi all, first post here.

    Played chess years ago, took it up again this year (seriously) I've my head stuck in books analysing games/studying openings. I'm not too bad of a player, well, getting there.... anyhow...

    I used to play a friend of mine years ago, he's pretty good, but he never opened a book, just learned himself. We met up during the week for a few games, for old times sake. I stuck with e4, he opened with... a6 or h6, out comes his rook, e6... his queen. Now I was under the impression 'he's dead in a few moves', but I honestly didn't know how to deal with it!! Beat him 3 / 2 out of 5 games, but really struggled.

    I've been sticking to the e4 opening, and sicilian on black but am struggling to compete with this. Has anyone got ay suggested games to analyse? Many thanks....


    Jason.
  2. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    09 Mar '06 12:09
    Originally posted by onyx2006
    Hi all, first post here.

    Played chess years ago, took it up again this year (seriously) I've my head stuck in books analysing games/studying openings. I'm not too bad of a player, well, getting there.... anyhow...

    I used to play a friend of mine years ago, he's pretty good, but he never opened a book, just learned himself. We met up during the week fo ...[text shortened]... with this. Has anyone got ay suggested games to analyse? Many thanks....


    Jason.
    how about your own? and seeing you're around 1200, I'm pretty sure what you'll find out is that you drop a lot of pieces and pawns. It doesn't really matter what else you do if you give away pieces. - luckily, there's an 'easy' solution to that: tactics tactics tactics... also take your time, don't rush moves. check and double check that you're not dropping anything.

    studying openings at 1200 won't probably make any difference (learning the opening principles will, but memorizing lines won't). because like you said yourself, you don't know what to do when your opponent deviates from book lines.
  3. Standard member onyx2006
    onyx2007
    09 Mar '06 12:34
    Sorry, what do you mean by dropping anything? You mean trading needlessly, or not spotting a good idea/move? Thanks for the reply!
  4. 09 Mar '06 13:12
    "Dropping" a piece means losing in through oversight. I think your story shows that knowing openings is not all that valuable. Your friend is probably good tactically and you can't use your opening knowledge against him because he doens't play 'em. Tactics is your answer. Study pins, forks, deflecting, etc. Build a solid center, develop your pieces, castle early and often. Don't just assume because an opponent plays odd moves that he's lost immediately.
  5. 09 Mar '06 13:21
    Originally posted by onyx2006
    Hi all, first post here.

    Played chess years ago, took it up again this year (seriously) I've my head stuck in books analysing games/studying openings. I'm not too bad of a player, well, getting there.... anyhow...

    I used to play a friend of mine years ago, he's pretty good, but he never opened a book, just learned himself. We met up during the week fo ...[text shortened]... with this. Has anyone got ay suggested games to analyse? Many thanks....


    Jason.
    If you're sticking to an opening it relies on the other guy playing it too. If he's doing stuff like moving his wing pawns and his rooks out then your usual Sicilian set-up isn't taking the most advantage of his unwise play.
    Just develop while chasing his heavy pieces around, then when you're fully developed and he's not, break. Against an underdeveloped opponent of a similar or lower rating its unlikely he'll be able to defend.
  6. Standard member onyx2006
    onyx2007
    09 Mar '06 13:58
    Originally posted by Knightlore
    Just develop while chasing his heavy pieces around, then when you're fully developed and he's not, break. Against an underdeveloped opponent of a similar or lower rating its unlikely he'll be able to defend.
    I get you, I think the problem tho is that when i was chasing - I overdeveloped, and got broken! :lol: Thanks for the tips guys!
  7. 09 Mar '06 14:02
    If Krammik played 1.h4 against kasparov the game would be pretty much over, becase that one move would have allowed kasparov the advantage ...

    but, None of us are at that level -- and if your friend can play 1h4, etc and win it shows his tactical knowledge is better than yours...and/or your blunders are greater

    opening knowledge isn't that helpful - even if you knew every opening and all the varations your still going to find the game difficualt when I simply play "h4"


    The best advice I can give you is think.....

    Why don't Grandmasters bring the rooks to the centre of the board [in the opening]?
    what are the weakness of a Rook?

    If your openant brings it out then try and limit its movement by attacking it with bishops and pawns.

    Brings the Queen out early? - Try and chase it DEVELOPING the minor pieces
  8. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    09 Mar '06 14:16
    Originally posted by onyx2006
    I get you, I think the problem tho is that when i was chasing - I overdeveloped, and got broken! :lol: Thanks for the tips guys!
    try to move every piece only once before you move anything twice. minor pieces first, heavy pieces last. try to figure out a safe and active place for your pieces, so you won't have to use precious tempo's to defend them and thus get behind in development. castle early, so you won't get you king stuck in the middle, where it will get checked and force you to defend (defending or capturing with a development move is good). try not to let your pieces get stuck behind pawns.

    every pawn-move costs a tempo, try not to push them unless it let's you develope a piece. not unless you have a really good reason. -playing behind in development is almost like being down a piece already.
  9. Standard member onyx2006
    onyx2007
    09 Mar '06 14:20
    Originally posted by Shinidoki
    it shows his tactical knowledge is better than yours...and/or your blunders are greater

    My tactical isn't too bad, his 'is' great tho. I'm getting better as I go on, blunders tho... dam blunders. True enough about openings, to me openings are just a formality, i mean don't get me wrong - I know a bad opening can loose you the game. It's when your in ...[text shortened]... d of endgames either - that's why i'm try to study/read up on both. But then along came h6!
  10. 09 Mar '06 14:33
    Just because a weak player plays an unsound move in the opening doesn't mean the game is over. You still have to beat him (or her). Usually, the bad move allows you to occupy the center, take over a file, win a pawn, start an attack on the opposite wing. This in turn allows you to accumulate even more advantages until the position reaches the breaking point and you uncork an impressive combination, queen a Pawn or mate his King. The important thing to remember is that even though you might hold the advantage, the game is not over till he tips his King.