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  1. 10 Aug '11 23:53
    Hi
    Instructive coincidence here.

    In another thread Varenka missed a possible chance to to pull off this mating pattern.


    V. Missed it and went on to win.

    (he had another good move in the position it was easily missed.)

    An engine suggested the trick that led to the above pattern.

    Do we really learn from our losses?

    Apparently not if there is a 22 year gap.

    I now introduce Simon Alapin (1856-1923) he missed two celebrated examples.

    You may want to test yourself..


    Black to play. (look at the position above.)


    White to play. (look out for that Knight on f8.)

    Solutions Below.












    A Fritz (There was such a player, the coincidence) - S. Alapin Germany 1889



    And 22 years later.

    Alapin - Levitsky, St.Petersburg 1911

  2. 11 Aug '11 00:04
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    So if I can put my recent lesson into practice within the next 20 years, it will prove once and for all that learning from a computer is indeed effeective... 😛

    With the amount of mention it got in a previous thread, and you starting another, it's the one pattern I had better never forget! 😉
  3. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    11 Aug '11 05:31
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Hi
    Instructive coincidence here.

    In another thread Varenka missed a possible chance to to pull off this mating pattern.

    [fen]1R6/5ppk/4p3/3p3p/1P6/4P2P/6rr/1N3RK1 w - - 0 6[/fen]
    V. Missed it and went on to win.

    (he had another good move in the position it was easily missed.)

    An engine suggested the trick that led to the above pattern.
    ...[text shortened]... 8 stops the regular pattern, but it is still there.} 2. Rexg7+ Kh8 3. Rg8+ Kh7 4. R2g7[/pgn]
    I have a bad blind spot for backward knight moves- I have lost to backward knight moves so many times OTB that I stopped counting, because it was pissing me off too much.
  4. 11 Aug '11 11:19 / 1 edit
    Hi Paul.

    You are not alone. I did a quick a search for a White Queen moving to c7
    being taken by Black Knight on d5. And just that one manouver threw up
    100's of examples usually followed by immediatte resignation.

    Two will suffice. It's root is just seeing your threats.

    Hyde Park - Sicilian Smaug RHP 2005


    White is not looking to good here, he needs a blunder to get back into the game.

    Instead off he goes to threaten mate on f7 and the Rook on d8. 18.Qc7 Nxc7 0-1.

    lubrio - kasparr RHP 2005


    The White Queen is attacked so chop the Knight.

    Alas White spots two undefended pieces on b7 and d7. 20.Qc7 Nxc7 0-1.

    Solution.

    When it's your move turn the board around then the backward Knight moves
    will be forward Knight moves and you will see them.

    Remember with the board turned around all of his pawns will now appear
    to be passed pawns so don't panic.
  5. 11 Aug '11 14:20
    Hey, thx for these examples.

    How does one search for these things on RHP?