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  1. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    09 Nov '14 23:37
    While watching Peter Svidller commentate on the World championship today, he mentioned a game played by Wang Hao against Victor Bologan with a recommendation to look it up. Well, i did, and sure enough it is a cracking game! Enjoy..

  2. 10 Nov '14 12:38 / 1 edit
    Great game. Perhaps the march of the White king was inspired by the famous Short vs Timman game from 1991 (though I much prefer this new game that Marinkatomb has posted):
  3. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    10 Nov '14 16:51
    Originally posted by Data Fly
    Great game. Perhaps the march of the White king was inspired by the famous Short vs Timman game from 1991 (though I much prefer this new game that Marinkatomb has posted):
    [pgn]
    [Event "Tilburg 53/115"]
    [Site "Tilburg 53/115"]
    [Date "1991.??.??"]
    [EventDate "?"]
    [Round "?"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [White "Nigel Short"]
    [Black "Jan Timman"]
    [ECO "B04"]
    [Wh ...[text shortened]... g7 Kxg7 28.R1d4 Rae8
    29.Qf6+ Kg8 30.h4 h5 31.Kh2 Rc8 32.Kg3 Rce8 33.Kf4 Bc8 34.Kg5
    1-0
    [/pgn]
    Yes, that is a really famous game, I'm absolutely sure Wang Hao has seen it. I wonder if there are any spectacular King walks on Rhp? GP??
  4. 11 Nov '14 01:28
    I'll have a look. I think the term is a Steel King.

    There appears to be two types.
    One is when a King is forced across the board by checks and survives.
    The other a is self imposed king march up the board to mate a King.

    Every chess player should be familiar with the Short game.
    Both Alekhine and Tarrasch have similiar marches.
  5. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    11 Nov '14 02:00
    Originally posted by Data Fly
    Great game. Perhaps the march of the White king was inspired by the famous Short vs Timman game from 1991 (though I much prefer this new game that Marinkatomb has posted):
    [pgn]
    [Event "Tilburg 53/115"]
    [Site "Tilburg 53/115"]
    [Date "1991.??.??"]
    [EventDate "?"]
    [Round "?"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [White "Nigel Short"]
    [Black "Jan Timman"]
    [ECO "B04"]
    [Wh ...[text shortened]... g7 Kxg7 28.R1d4 Rae8
    29.Qf6+ Kg8 30.h4 h5 31.Kh2 Rc8 32.Kg3 Rce8 33.Kf4 Bc8 34.Kg5
    1-0
    [/pgn]
    I remember a guy showing me this game at a tournament in the early 90's right after this was played (info traveled slower then).

    It has stuck with me ever since.
  6. Standard member caissad4
    Child of the Novelty
    11 Nov '14 08:39
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    I'll have a look. I think the term is a Steel King.

    There appears to be two types.
    One is when a King is forced across the board by checks and survives.
    The other a is self imposed king march up the board to mate a King.

    Every chess player should be familiar with the Short game.
    Both Alekhine and Tarrasch have similiar marches.
    I believe it was Wilhelm Steinitz who said, "My king likes to go on long walks and bring home lots of treasure".
    BTW, Wilhelm Steinitz was the first US citizen to be an official World Chess Champion. He became a US citizen about a year before losing his match with Lasker. His games, with their long drawn out strategic objectives, have always fascinated me.
  7. 11 Nov '14 11:02
    Originally posted by caissad4
    He became a US citizen about a year before losing his match with Lasker.
    Actually Steinitz became a US citizen on the 23rd November 1888, five and a bit years before Lasker defeated him for the title.

    It's clear that Steinitz considered himself American even before then as he insisted on having the US flag next to him during his 1886 match against Zukertort.

    I'd always thought that Steinitz was British before he became American, but this might be untrue. The always reliable Edward Winter touched on this subject: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/winter28.html