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  1. 24 Nov '09 01:56 / 2 edits
    A player on this website just said that Emanual Lasker didn't write "Lasker's manual of chess"

    He said Edward Lasker wrote it.
    Is there any truth to this?

    I follow chess history and I know of both of these gentlemen but I have never heard about this?

    BTW the player here who said that is "shorbock"
  2. 24 Nov '09 02:09
    Just a mis-understanding folks...nothing to see here, move along.
  3. 24 Nov '09 03:16
    You'll read loads of unfounded claims here.
  4. 24 Nov '09 03:18
    This is a police crime scene! Move along citizen.
    Do not, make me abuse my power.
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Gonzalo de Córdoba
    24 Nov '09 11:56
    (o Y o)
  6. Standard member PatzerLars
    pawn grabber
    24 Nov '09 13:52 / 1 edit
    I always wonder when I read those names if the mentioned persons were related or not. ( not intending to save the thread ... )
  7. 24 Nov '09 14:32
    Originally posted by PatzerLars
    I always wonder when I read those names if the mentioned persons were related or not. ( not intending to save the thread ... )
    OK since we're not saving the thread, who's that guy in your profile? he looks like adrian monk, the defective detective.
  8. Standard member PatzerLars
    pawn grabber
    24 Nov '09 14:35
    Originally posted by philidor position
    OK since we're not saving the thread, who's that guy in your profile? he looks like adrian monk, the defective detective.
    ROFL

    It's J.R. Capablanca in his twenties.
  9. 24 Nov '09 14:37
    Originally posted by PatzerLars
    I always wonder when I read those names if the mentioned persons were related or not. ( not intending to save the thread ... )
    The story is that Edward Lasker wondered the same thing. It wasn't until years later, when Emanuel was really old (maybe dying ... I forget) that he (or his wife ... again I forget) told Edward that they were in fact distant cousins. We need Greenpawn to get the facts straight because I don't remember where I first read this. I do think that it is true that they were distant cousins though.
  10. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    24 Nov '09 14:46
    Originally posted by Automaton
    A player on this website just said that Emanual Lasker didn't write "Lasker's manual of chess"

    He said Edward Lasker wrote it.
    Is there any truth to this?

    I follow chess history and I know of both of these gentlemen but I have never heard about this?

    BTW the player here who said that is "shorbock"
    shorbock is a confidence man; believe what you will
  11. 24 Nov '09 21:19
    Hi

    "We need Greenpawn to get the facts straight..."

    Glad to oblige.

    Edward and Emanuel Lasker were twins.

    When he was three Edward was snatched from his family home by a wild bear.

    Emanuel went on to become World Chess Champion and in his book
    'Common Sense in Chess' he has a dedication to his twin brother.

    "In memory of my twin brother Edward who was eaten by a bear."

    (this was left out in the modern reprint by mistake.)

    Enter Hans von Rickenocker.
    Evidence is on hand to prove that Hans von Rickenocker was infact Jack the Ripper.

    He fled London, changed his name to Edward Lasker and settled in America.

    I have read all of Edward Lasker's books, he makes no mention of Jack the Ripper.
    So that is proof he was Jack the Ripper.

    People often get them mixed up. A good way to remember who was who
    is that one of them was the World Champion and the other was Jack the Ripper.
  12. 24 Nov '09 21:32 / 2 edits
    No...They were long distant cousins and most likely that isn't even true.

    And Jack the Ripper was an american named...

    Francis Tumblety (c. 1833–1903) was a seemingly uneducated or self-educated Irish-American from Rochester, New York. He earned a small fortune posing as an "Indian Herb" doctor throughout the United States and Canada, and occasionally travelling across Europe as well.[3] He was commonly perceived as a misogynist and was connected to the deaths of some of his patients; he was charged by the authorities in Canada, but skipped the country. He was also charged with supplying herbs to procure an illegal abortion. He gained a reputation for his eccentric, ostentatious clothes, which were frequently of a military nature. Tumblety was arrested on 6 May 1865 in St. Louis, Missouri and incarcerated in the Old Capitol Prison, Washington, D.C., for complicity in the Abraham Lincoln assassination, but was later released as having no involvement.[36]

    Tumblety was in England in 1888 and had visited the country on other occasions; during one such earlier trip he became closely acquainted with Victorian writer Hall Caine, with whom it was suggested he had an affair[37] and from whom he tried to borrow money. He claimed to have treated many famous English patients, including Charles Dickens, for a variety of illnesses. He was arrested on 7 November 1888, on charges of "gross indecency", apparently for engaging in homosexuality, which was illegal at the time. Awaiting trial, he instead fled the country for France on 24 November 1888, and thence to the United States.[38] Already notorious in the United States for his self-promotion and previous criminal charges, his arrest was reported in the New York Times as being connected to the Ripper murders.[39] American newspaper reports that Scotland Yard tried to extradite him were not confirmed by the British press or the London police. The New York City Police, who had him under surveillance, said, "there is no proof of his complicity in the Whitechapel murders, and the crime for which he is under bond in London is not extraditable".[40]

    After the initial interest in Tumblety in 1888, he was mentioned as having been a Ripper suspect by former Detective Chief Inspector John George Littlechild of the Metropolitan Police Service in a letter to journalist and author George R. Sims, dated 23 September 1913.[3][37] Tumblety died in 1903 of heart disease[37] in St. Louis and is buried in Rochester, New York. In the episode of Mystery Quest featuring Jack the Ripper, Francis Tumblety fit the profile, being the most contemporary suspect.

    He found out his wife was a prostitute, so he took out his anger on other prositutes.
    He also had a hatred for women which caused his homosexuality.
    And the murders stopped when he left england to return to the united states.
    And the infamous "From Hell" letter matched his handwritting.

    They had a documentary on him, proving it was him.
    None of the evidence linked anyone but him.
  13. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    25 Nov '09 02:40 / 1 edit
    And I always thought the "Ripper" appellation was a flatulence issue. It was a "Jumpin' Jack Flash, it's a gas, gas, gas" kind of thing. Or so I read on the internet.
  14. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    25 Nov '09 06:07
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    And I always thought the "Ripper" appellation was a flatulence issue. It was a "Jumpin' Jack Flash, it's a gas, gas, gas" kind of thing. Or so I read on the internet.
    If it's on the web, it has gotta be true unless Glenn Beck has talked about it
  15. Standard member atticus2
    Frustrate the Bad
    25 Nov '09 17:35
    Gladys Lasker wrote it