Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. 21 Apr '06 09:21 / 1 edit
    I was browsing ChessGames.com and its innumerable Sicilian variations. One variation that caught my eye is B32 or the "Old Sicilian." I never saw it before and yet it seems to be a strong line.

    I've been looking all over through the Shredder database and I also used some strong engines on critical lines. However, it seems solid as a brick. In fact, I have found much tougher lines for Black in the Najdorf than in this opening.

    If Black hasa good game with no real weakness, why has the Old Sicilian gone out of favor at the highest levels? Also, what do you guys think about it?
  2. 21 Apr '06 10:40
    Ahhh..........This is an opening I play as black a lot at FICS.....both blitz and standard (15min) time contols

    After e5 (I also like e6--its been quite sucessful for me..) The game can become interesting, I've seen several responses -- Some put the Knight on f5, some retreat to b3 or f3, few capture Nxc6...but Nb5 is by far most common (generally planning Nd6+ Bxd6 Qxd6 which I hate and avoid with d6 (usually)


    I do like this opening, and thus far, I've been sucessful with it - but if its not played by Gm's i'm sure there is a reason....other than that -- openings go in, and go out of fashion
  3. 21 Apr '06 10:40
    Are you talking about the Classical Sicilian, where black plays his queen's knight to c6 early. I've never heard of it called the "old sicilian." Nothing wrong with it, compared to Najdorf. Results about the same. Just taste and style Fischer and Kasparov played Najdorf, so the crowd does the same.
  4. 21 Apr '06 15:35 / 1 edit
    It's playable, but many sicilian players prefer not to see a maroczy bind, which can happen after Nb5 d6, c4. Also, variations in the "old" sicilian are not as tactical as the Najdorf and if black wants to play "solid" he has other choices.
  5. 21 Apr '06 20:12 / 1 edit
    Just to clear any confusion, here is an example move order:

    1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6
    3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 e5
    5.Nb5 d6 6.c4 Be7
    7.b3 f5 8.exf5 Bxf5
    9.Bd3 e4 10.Be2 a6
    11.Nbc3 Bf6 12.O-O Nge7
    13.a3 O-O

    Clearly, Black has a comfortable game after making of use of some common tactics in the Old Sicilian. White's bind never has time to get a grip on the position because Black just plays ...f5!

  6. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    22 Apr '06 13:32 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by exigentsky
    Just to clear any confusion, here is an example move order:

    1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6
    3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 e5
    5.Nb5 d6 6.c4 Be7
    7.b3 f5 8.exf5 Bxf5
    9.Bd3 e4 10.Be2 a6
    11.Nbc3 Bf6 12.O-O Nge7
    13.a3 O-O

    Clearly, Black has a comfortable game after making of use of some common tactics in the Old Sicilian. White's bind never has time to get a grip on t ...[text shortened]... ust plays ...f5!

    [fen]r2q1rk1/1p2n1pp/p1np1b2/5b2/2P1p3/PPN5/4BPPP/RNBQ1RK1 w - - 1 14[/fen]
    That is the Kalashnikov, and is in reasonably common use. MCO gives 7. N1c3 for white and looks at 7.b3 in a footnote. The preamble to the chapter says that it was used a lot in the 1990's but that white is gaining the upper hand as the opening's surprise value has waned.