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  1. Subscriber sundown316
    The Mighty Messenger
    11 Dec '15 23:55 / 1 edit
    I know I had a thread about this topic already on here, but I can't find it. After his loss at London today, Naka is now +0-12=? against Magnus. Why does Magnus dominate Naka so easily?
  2. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    12 Dec '15 03:50
    Originally posted by sundown316
    I know I had a thread about this topic already on here, but I can't find it. After his loss at London today, Naka is now +0-12=? against Magnus. Why does Magnus dominate Naka so easily?
    It's an unfavorable clash of styles for Naka. He thrives on imbalanced positions. Carlsen likes to take fewer risks and build the tiniest of advantages into a win. He's also happy to use the opponent's risk-taking against him.
  3. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    12 Dec '15 11:11
    Originally posted by sundown316
    I know I had a thread about this topic already on here, but I can't find it. After his loss at London today, Naka is now +0-12=? against Magnus. Why does Magnus dominate Naka so easily?
    It's simply down to End game technique i think. Carlsen has won some nice games in the middle game against Naka but the majority are endings. Nakamura will never catch up now i fear, Carlsen just values different things in the position and Nakamura just can't make that switch. It's interesting that, once this end game arrises with the two bishops and the pawns on c6/f6, Carlsen judged this position to be very pleasant for white. I'm not sure how many players would agree with him. While it is true that white 'can always improve his position' as Carlsen put it, most players i feel would look at that position and not see any entry points! It is true that white can always improve the position of his bishops, while black may end up with passive everything, but if you can't find that shot that allows a pawn through then black is holding. Nakamura is suffering from all those years of bullet, you never get to play a proper ending..
  4. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    12 Dec '15 13:43
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    It's simply down to End game technique i think. Carlsen has won some nice games in the middle game against Naka but the majority are endings. Nakamura will never catch up now i fear, Carlsen just values different things in the position and Nakamura just can't make that switch. It's interesting that, once this end game arrises with the two bishops and the ...[text shortened]... g. Nakamura is suffering from all those years of bullet, you never get to play a proper ending..
    So how many of those games were at full tournament time controls?
  5. Subscriber sundown316
    The Mighty Messenger
    13 Dec '15 00:28
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    So how many of those games were at full tournament time controls?

    All of them. The only times Naka has ever beaten Carlsen is at Blitz.
  6. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    13 Dec '15 07:38
    Originally posted by sundown316
    I know I had a thread about this topic already on here, but I can't find it. After his loss at London today, Naka is now +0-12=? against Magnus. Why does Magnus dominate Naka so easily?
    I think Anatoly Karpov answered your question years ago when asked: What is the difference between a world champion and a strong grandmaster? (I'm paraphrasing a bit) Karpov responded "The difference between a world champion and a strong grandmaster is not great, but a world champion can play all parts of the game just a little better than a strong grandmaster.
  7. Subscriber sundown316
    The Mighty Messenger
    13 Dec '15 13:32
    Originally posted by bill718
    I think Anatoly Karpov answered your question years ago when asked: What is the difference between a world champion and a strong grandmaster? (I'm paraphrasing a bit) Karpov responded "The difference between a world champion and a strong grandmaster is not great, but a world champion can play all parts of the game just a little better than a strong grandmaster.
    I agree. What Carlsen does so well is to "flow" into the endgame so seamlessly, his opponent doesn't realize it until it is too late. Naka doesn't possess this ability nearly as well as Magnus, and continues the middle game when he should be getting ready to enter the ending.