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  1. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    10 Feb '11 02:32
    This is written under the influence of a 2001 Cabernet Savignon, so I apologize ahead of time if I slur on the keyboard!

    I lost a game today (not vino influenced) that should have been a straightforward win, but I had the 2011 Championship and the 1/14 clan league start at the same time, and the game load caught up with me.

    That said, my opponent played with great energy and guts in defense, and deservedly won a great rescue. He was proud, and asked me if I would mind if he posted it.

    I thought it was a nice touch, his asking, but my immediate answer was "Of course!"

    That's what got me to thinking- I am 45, but would I have had the same attitude when I started at 21?

    When I started (1987, but didn't play much until 1991), I was young and competitive, and my ego was deeply tied up in every win and loss- and there were more losses. I took every loss as the end of the world, and I was often devastated.

    I worked hard, getting my USCF OTB rating to the mid 1800s in 1995, but then got married, and promptly watched my rating hit the floor at 1600.

    Now I am older, with a more serious job and two daughters, and I find that my play has a whole new meaning to me.

    I have played so many games that the result of any one game has very little meaning to me, unless it has an effect on someone else-as a result, I play clan games and the US Amateur Team South Championship tournament very seriously, but the rest I play for fun.

    Winning and losing are still important to me, but far less than they used to be. I have reached the point where a beautiful loss is sometimes more enjoyable to me than a "junk" win where the other guy just choked, and I happened to be the guy playing him.

    I suppose my reason for typing this monologue is that I really appreciate this site because of the personalities I have met here. I communicate regularly with a variety of players from all over the world who appreciate the game, and it seems that each person has a unique perspective that adds to my appreciation.

    I have long given up the idea that I will ever be the World Champion, but I have developed a very fond and profound appreciation for "going through the motions" anyway!

    There is a reason why I play here, when I could play a game against a computer program very easily, without a recurring fee- it is the other people who make the game enjoyable. I have learned to appreciate the moves as much as the result.

    I'm done! Insert punch line here!

    Paul
  2. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    10 Feb '11 04:09
    rec'd
  3. 10 Feb '11 04:46
    ahhh man, I love this place !
  4. 10 Feb '11 04:55
    Chess, for most of us, is about 2 things: the people and the game. One without the other is unthinkable.
  5. Standard member Mathurine
    sorozatgyilkos
    10 Feb '11 07:11
    rec'd
  6. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    10 Feb '11 21:14
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    This is written under the influence of a 2001 Cabernet Savignon, so I apologize ahead of time if I slur on the keyboard!

    I lost a game today (not vino influenced) that should have been a straightforward win, but I had the 2011 Championship and the 1/14 clan league start at the same time, and the game load caught up with me.

    That said, my opponent ...[text shortened]... preciate the moves as much as the result.

    I'm done! Insert punch line here!

    Paul
    Yes, glad to meet you too Paul.
  7. Standard member hedonist
    peacedog's keeper
    10 Feb '11 21:29
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    I have reached the point where a beautiful loss is sometimes more enjoyable to me than a "junk" win where the other guy just choked, and I happened to be the guy playing him.
    Thats the way I've always thought.

    My lack of competative spirit is probably why I havn't improved much in 20 years of play.