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  1. 11 Jun '09 08:31
    I want to take my game back to fundamentals. One principle I'm aware of is to maintain the strength of your pawns that are protecting the king.

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1070716

    In this game Kasparov plays 10. h5

    To ME this looks like a bad move, but obviously this is Garry Kasparov. All of his pawns in front of his king are advanced and his knight is easily driven back and away from the center with 10...h3.

    Can someone explain the purpose of this move? Also, am I too rigid with the rule not to over extend your king's protective pawns?
  2. 11 Jun '09 08:54
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    I want to take my game back to fundamentals. One principle I'm aware of is to maintain the strength of your pawns that are protecting the king.

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1070716

    In this game Kasparov plays 10. h5

    To ME this looks like a bad move, but obviously this is Garry Kasparov. All of his pawns in front of his kin ...[text shortened]... this move? Also, am I too rigid with the rule not to over extend your king's protective pawns?
    It seems to me that kaspy lost this game...
  3. 11 Jun '09 09:15 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    I want to take my game back to fundamentals. One principle I'm aware of is to maintain the strength of your pawns that are protecting the king.

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1070716

    In this game Kasparov plays 10. h5

    To ME this looks like a bad move, but obviously this is Garry Kasparov. All of his pawns in front of his kin ...[text shortened]... this move? Also, am I too rigid with the rule not to over extend your king's protective pawns?
    The King's Indian Defence is a strange (but great!) opening. Black always tries to attack on the kingside, despite the fact that he has castled kingside himself. Because the centre is often blocked Black's king isn't as susceptible to an attack as it may seem and White usually decides to attack the queenside instead.

    If you think about how winning mating attacks work, it is often in part because the king gets blocked in with his own pawns. An open king can be surprisingly safe, partly because the would-be attacker's pieces have trouble getting close and partly because the defenders own pieces have lots of squares to maneuver on without getting hampered with their own pawns.
  4. 12 Jun '09 00:11
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    I want to take my game back to fundamentals. One principle I'm aware of is to maintain the strength of your pawns that are protecting the king.

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1070716

    In this game Kasparov plays 10. h5

    To ME this looks like a bad move, but obviously this is Garry Kasparov. All of his pawns in front of his kin ...[text shortened]... this move? Also, am I too rigid with the rule not to over extend your king's protective pawns?
    it depends entirely on the situation.
    leaving the pawns in front of the king is a good rule of thumb,
    however there are many other situations when it is beneficial to press these pawns. for example, in a london system game in which both sides have castled kingside, white can and usually does push his pawns because usually black has no immediate chance of exploiting this weakness. i.e. the king is as safe with them as he is without them and thus the pawns can be used to attack.
  5. Standard member orion25
    Art is hard
    12 Jun '09 09:29
    basically if the position is closed you can push your pawns up, the KID aims to close the center and attack the kingside, which is what happens in the game. Tha KID is a race to see who is quicker either black's pawn push or white's disassemblement of the center, whoever succeeds first is generally going to win
  6. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    12 Jun '09 11:49
    I'm not a KID player myself, but it seems the point of h5 was to redeploy the knight rather than pawn storming (which of course is nevertheless the general plan at the same time, as others pointed out). the points regarding the 'weakening of the king' were more relevant at 2.g6, and certainly at the 10th move the die had been long cast.

    however it's also beneficial to note that in sharp openings like KID the opening theory mostly supercedes any practical rules of thumb. so even if "don't push castled pawns" might be generally good advice, concrete variations (ie. theory) include known specific exceptions. because no matter how 'weak' (in the rule of thumb sense) the king might appear, it ISN'T weak if the test of thousands of GMs and time can't provide a winning line.

    to learn about these things you need to begin playing openings that weaken your castled pawns deliberately. basically any fianchettoing opening. sure you'll get demolished at first, but it's the only way to learn how to deal with the specific problems. but it also means heavy booking up on opening theory, which might not be that efficient time usage yet on your level.

    although, if you like quiet games, it might be best to keep the castling intact. because once you push them, they WILL be attacked. which you can also see in how black's kingside ended being ripped apart. it's the downside, and you need to be prepared for it at all times.
  7. 12 Jun '09 13:18
    Here's another question. After Rg4+ black can simply capture the rook with his knight, winning the exchange.

    Is there some kind of mating web I can't see? Because it seems to be that, while white has a huge pawn advantage, black would still be solidly ahead in material.
  8. 12 Jun '09 13:38
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    Here's another question. After Rg4+ black can simply capture the rook with his knight, winning the exchange.

    Is there some kind of mating web I can't see? Because it seems to be that, while white has a huge pawn advantage, black would still be solidly ahead in material.
    if n x g4 then qg6+ and mate on f7 next move.
  9. 12 Jun '09 17:05 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by rja211077
    if n x g4 then qg6+ and mate on f7 next move.
    and thus the mating net was found.
  10. 12 Jun '09 19:17
    The only reason I can see is to diffuse the power of white playing BG4 then Be6+, but I'm no master level player either.