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  1. Standard member Nowakowski
    10. O-O
    27 Feb '10 15:59
    A nod to GP34:

    I’ve heard a lot of our great RHP community is down on V. Topalov.

    But Why?


    The youngster Magnus Carlsen is good no doubt - I don’t think any of us will deny it.
    But!
    We shouldn’t forget about Veselin Topalov! He is pretty good in his own right.

    The guy has some amazing games, and some incredibly deep assessments;
    how in the world can he see all that, that far out? ...

    You know what I'm referring to right?


    ...


    Let me show you what I meen:



    Those two bishops sure do look like mighty escorts. What a position for white!
    But … How could black with TWO rooks, let that happen?

    You wouldn’t believe me if I told you.
    So look:



    And don’t forget



    OK. You caught that right?

    - No?

    It kind of looks like V. Topalov was reading the Corner there for a second
    - Did he just sac two pieces?

    Yep.

    Lets take a look at why; the final assessment is incredible!



    This is the final push of everything here. Topalov has a passed pawn pair…
    …A central passed pawn pair at that.

    If d6! Is played, white’s pawns will look very serious.



    Tada! Topalov does get off d6, but as you can see; things don’t all look gravy for Topalov here.
    or do they?

    - Topalov thinks he’s set. (I’ll agree, why not right?)

    White, keeping his pawns in mind only needs enough material to usher his pawns a tiny bit further!
    If Topalov can just trade Queen’s, things look positive with the bishop pair against the rooks…
    The pawns proximity overrules the rooks! - Watch Topalov work:



    Remember those crazy sacrafices (You should… it was only a few paragraphs ago!)
    Well Topalov really did play those, and really did fit them into this game,
    And then he really won it.

    Heck - it’s a modern masterpiece!




    Psssst... Notice here that Black really has nothing left - After the check, black
    can't play Re8 for fear of Bxe8. Virtually any other move leads to c8=Q+...

    -GIN
  2. Standard member orion25
    Art is hard
    27 Feb '10 16:11
    Thank you nowakowsky for this brilliant game, I rec'd it.
    And thank you GP for making me read the whole post 😉
  3. 27 Feb '10 17:40
    It looks and reads much better. It wants to be read and people will read it.

    Not saying I told you so but 'I told you so'.

    (previous post I noticed was not rec'd.)

    But the GM games are easy to do. 😉

    Do a game from RHP.

    Game 7141633 from Tournament 9271 where I'm waiting on
    Swiss Gambit to meet me in the final. (that should be a good game).

    It was I think one the best games I've played on here for a while.

    I put some work in on here as his White was heading for a draw so I knew
    I was not playing a blunderer. Thankfully it's tactical.
    The other ended in a draw just about the time I went for my conditional trap.

    It is the one instructive monent which you will not know so I'll explain.

    Here White to play.



    I played 32.Qg4 and sent a conditional move. If 32.Re8 then 33.Qh4+

    I wanted him to play Re8 and then play quickly in answer to my 32.Qh4+

    I figured he would be clicking through his 'games waiting' list I wanted him
    to see this postion whilst he still had the e6 pawn covered in his head and
    play the obvious 32...Qe7.

    He played multiple moves a day so there was a chance he may fall for it.

    It worked. My game log told me he replied within seconds of getting
    my conditional move. The e6 pawn goes and that is the game.

    Also this - me to play.



    I was surprised to see this position, I thought my Knight on c5 was going to get chopped.

    I've not got around to checking this with a box. I rarely do if I win.

    But I could find nothing brilliant with the discovered check.
    In the end I went for a mate trap. (just looked again - there is nothing... is there?).
  4. 27 Feb '10 18:04
    Thanks greenpawn for posting this gem of a game. It truly underlines the awesome power of the passed pawn and the even greater power of connected passed pawns. Most definitely worth a pair or rooks indeed! Topalov is really a brilliant player!
  5. Standard member hunterknox
    Hopeless romantic
    27 Feb '10 19:09
    Great chess, but what on Earth do you mean by incumbency?
  6. Standard member Exuma
    Anansi
    27 Feb '10 19:58
    Perhaps it means Topalov has a shot at the title (as in holding the position of world champion).
  7. 27 Feb '10 20:07
    Wow. Nice game.

    I've been playing around with this opening a bit recently, as black, and have found playing the exaggerated fianchetto to be lots of fun. THere is a lot you can do with it.

    This game though, is awesome. In looking through some other similar games, there are several others that have copied Topalov and played that first rook sac (18. Rxe4!), illustrating just how much theory is involved in this opening. That is quite the move to get the passed pawn.

    There's another game with identical move order through 28 moves! Banikas v. Sokolov 07/2006. So that game I guess was played after this one, where white deviates from this line to play 29. Qxe2. Black is able to capitalize on this and, ironically, executes a rook sac of his own in order to capture White's c-pawn. I guess Banikas recognized the game as good enough to memorize, but not enough to protect the main advantage of white's position.

    Black wins that one, but it was hard fought, and took 81 moves before White resigns. I'd post the game but I'm not sure how. Here's the link though: http://www.365chess.com/view_game.php?g=3375184
  8. 27 Feb '10 20:49
    While in no way meant to detract from the OP's point, the first rook sac is reasonably well-established theory.

    Even then, knowing those 18 moves of theory is still rather impressive.
  9. 27 Feb '10 22:09
    I watched his last Linares game relayed live on FICS and the endgame was nothing short of amazing.
  10. Standard member Nowakowski
    10. O-O
    27 Feb '10 22:40
    Originally posted by Meadows
    While in no way meant to detract from the OP's point, the first rook sac is reasonably well-established theory.

    Even then, knowing those 18 moves of theory is still rather impressive.
    That is accurate - thats why I didn't waste to much time on it.

    Well pointed out. 🙂
  11. 27 Feb '10 23:43
    Ha! - scacchipazzo is giving me the credit for it.

    Cheers mate. 🙂
  12. 01 Mar '10 10:30
    Originally posted by Meadows
    While in no way meant to detract from the OP's point, the first rook sac is reasonably well-established theory.

    Even then, knowing those 18 moves of theory is still rather impressive.
    maybe so, but was the rook sac "well established theory" before Topalov played it?
    I'm not bein a smart-ass, but it's a relevant question as to determining the ingenuity of Topalov as it relates to this game. Obviously, it would be very different if he had memorized 18 moves than if, 18 moves in, he came up with a novelty sac OTB that turned into "well established theory".
  13. 01 Mar '10 11:03
    Originally posted by Big Orange Country
    maybe so, but was the rook sac "well established theory" before Topalov played it?
    I'm not bein a smart-ass, but it's a relevant question as to determining the ingenuity of Topalov as it relates to this game. Obviously, it would be very different if he had memorized 18 moves than if, 18 moves in, he came up with a novelty sac OTB that turned into "well established theory".
    That's a good point and I hadn't checked. I've only had a quick look now (and perhaps someone with more complete databases or know-how would do better). The position before white's 18th had been reached twice by Kramnik and he played 18. Ne5 both times. As for 18. Rxe4, I could only find one game before Topalov's, and white went on to lose in that case. So perhaps it was Topalov that popularised this as theory.

    As for whether it was an OTB idea, I'd still be dubious, but that's just my personal scepticism 😛
  14. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    01 Mar '10 22:01
    People are not down on Topalov for his play at the board, which is nearly universally respected and admired. But his games away from the board, and more especially those orchestrated by his manager, cast such disrepute upon professional chess as to provoke questions as to why he is permitted to compete at all.


    12.1
    The players shall take no action that will bring the game of chess into disrepute.
  15. 15 Mar '10 01:45
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    People are not down on Topalov for his play at the board, which is nearly universally respected and admired. But his games away from the board, and more especially those orchestrated by his manager, cast such disrepute upon professional chess as to provoke questions as to why he is permitted to compete at all.


    12.1
    The players shall take no action that will bring the game of chess into disrepute.
    Exactly. God he nearly ruined that match with Kramnik in, what was it 06?