Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. 25 May '11 03:05
    Hi Will.

    I tell it as I see it mate. I know no other way.

    Gregory Kaidanov Vs Sam Shankland.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/OnlineChessLessons#p/u/25/mWA4w5rcHiQ

    Nice and clear with just the perfect use of graphics.
    You have a good voice and I do like the way you give
    your opinions on moves, but you need a script.

    Too many "I don't knows..." and you get bogged down
    on trivialities by doing it live and jumping from one idea to another.

    This game would have been a dream to noted up but you suddenly started
    going on about the f1 Bishop and why it won't move to gain a tempo,
    spending (for a video) a long time on it.
    Back to the game and White played Bd3 the very next move!.

    You just spent ages telling us why he won't.

    3½ minutes in you get all tied up and not sure why White played Bxc4
    and stray off course, then admit 'Now I'm looking at it..."
    which tells me you are doing off the cuff.

    The commentary between 3:30 and 5:55 is cleary being made up
    as you go along with pauses as you think and "I don't understand...."

    I think you do nail what White for hoping for (eventually)
    and was banking on Black playing the obvious Ng4.

    The line you give (again clearly being made up on the spot)
    with Black taking the e5 pawn and a White mate from nowhere was
    not required or could have been explained more smoothly.

    But it is this one that prompted the review:
    (you do ask for feedback - this is feed back....My way)

    Della Morte v William Stewart, Argentina 2010

    http://www.onlinechesslessons.net/2011/05/24/william-stewart-defeats-an-international-master-own-game-analysis/

    The video of the game was poor. A menu thing keeps dropping down,
    you appeared to be making up the analysis as you went along. (again).

    What was all that nonsense about if Black plays 10…Nh7.?

    It reminded me of one of my joke Horses Ass vids.

    You moved far too quick and the main instructive point.
    The Reason Why White Lost was not mentioned at all.

    You could have nailed this one down perfectly.

    If you are going to note up games don't be all chummy chummy.
    Put the boot in. Your readers'listeners will trust you.

    White lost because he followed theory without knowing why he was
    playing the moves. When his memory failed he was left in well known postion.
    (It's part of Argentina's folk lore for Pete's sake) and just did not know what to do.

    Here:

    White has just played 13.Bb5 threatening 14.0-0+ so Black cannot play 13…axb5.


    It’s still theory and you do explain the reason behind 23.Bb5.
    (I wonder how many people recognise this position. I did right away.
    It appears Will you did not, no mentioned of the Argentine connection at all.)

    After 13…..Kg7 14.0-0 Ne5


    White should now play 15.Bg3 hitting the e5 Knight with check.
    The e5 Knight covers f7 and the idea of 13.Bb5 is to prevent Black from
    playing Nc6 or Nd7 to answer Bxe5 with Nxe5.

    You mention this and admit you are most likely lost if White plays
    15.Bg3 and that was all you said as you quickly fumble about looking
    for a knock out.

    (Now was the time to mention Argentine connection).

    Instead of 15.Bg3 White played 15.Rf6?? and lost painfully.
    A typical out of the books and into the frying pan move.
    A very instructive moment which you allowed to pass you by.

    And today’s lesson is:

    The dangers of blindly following opening moves without fully
    understanding why you are playing them.


    And…(and this is a crime at any level.) Not Knowing The Classics.

    Della Morte was playing on memory cells up till here.


    The sole idea of 13.Bb5 was to add bite to 15.Bg3, else 13.B anywhere
    to threaten 14.0-0+ would have been OK.

    15.Bg3 is the key move after the piece sac. It’s been known since 1955!

    Della Morte remembered the moves up till 13.Bb5 and suddenly he dried up.
    It’s obvious from the follow up he played 13.Bb5 because he had seen it but
    not studied it, a very big difference.

    Did your 13.Kg7 catch him out?


    Now on his own the reason why he played 13.Bb5 was lost to him.
    He tried to justify it by playing the Rook sac 15.Rf6??.

    You say Della Morte is in the top 50 of Argentina.

    Surely he has heard of the Gothenburg Triangle.
    Surely you have heard of the 3 Russians v 3 Argentineans in Gothenburg 1955.

    You say in your vid it was all computer analysis.
    (Your computer knows more about the games history than you do.)

    I quote you:

    "White took matters into the extremely complicated and aggressive
    Bg5 variation, and I countered with a rare sideline that is not entirely
    sound with an early Be7 and g5.
    Apparently Della Morte was unfamiliar with the computer analysis that
    nearly refutes this line, and was unable to accurately weave his way
    through the resulting complications."

    Computer analysis?

    Gothenburg 1955

    3 Russians play 3 Argentineans in the same round and all 3 Russians played ,
    as in your game,11.Nxe6.
    It was in this tournament the Knight sac was first introduced.

    Keres - Najdorf
    Spassky - Pilnik
    Geller - Panno

    Both Najdorf and Pilnik tried, as in your game, 13.Kg7


    and lost quickly after 14.0-0 Ne5 15.Bg3!

    Panno saw the mess the other two were getting in so tried 13…Ne5.
    Geller played 14.Bg3! (The move time forgot) And Panno too was crushed.

    A little bit of theory can be a dangerous thing and we have all forgotten
    our theory OTB before. But not knowing the games history……Good Grief.

    A chess teachers vid should entertain and instruct. This vid did neither.
    People will learn more about the game from the review rather than the vid.
    This should not be the case.

    A little bit of research, know what you are going say at the key moments,
    take them more seriously and be self critical.

    End of review.

    Interesting footnote:

    I know someone who did study the Gothenburg Triangle. (without a computer).
    He went into the same line as Black v Gligoric 3 years later (1958) and played 13…Rh7.


    He knew Gligoric was a correspondent at Gothenburg and figured quite
    rightly Gligoric would know of the Triangle and walk right into it.
    So he prepared this wee surprise for him.

    The Black player was winning but accepted a draw because it meant
    he qualified for the next cycle of the World Championship.

    That player was a 15 year old kid from Brooklyn. Bobby Fischer.

    Here is the game your video was based on.

  2. 25 May '11 09:34
    thanks. this is the definition of the 'only chess' forum... looking forward to reading and watching, maybe with tea this time.
  3. 27 May '11 02:30
    Many thanks for the comments and criticism - it is definitely appreciated. These videos I'm trying to produce are a continuous work in progress, and I'm still trying to perfect the formula for the viewers' education and entertainment. Thanks again, and if you have any other feedback - please let me know!

    Will
  4. 27 May '11 11:33 / 1 edit
    Hi Will

    Good to see you took it on the chin.
    As I said when you are in the grooove you do well, it's just annoying
    to look at those couple of vids knowing you could do better.

    Those minutes are precious, one should should (in my opinion) prepare
    them like a book. What game you are going to show, what you are going
    to say and what parts of the game you are going to analyse. (less is best).

    That game has gone into my instructive games DB and will feature
    on my next demo. It's a perfect example of Book v OTB Ability.
    The fact the lad is an IM makes it all the more instructive.

    A stone wall case of a player playing a book move not knowing why he played it.
    When it was time for him to take over he sat there with his thumb up his bum
    and brain in neutral.

    The whole story of the Triangle makes great copy, every writer and
    teacher uses it, you have let a piece of gold dust slip through your fingers.

    One of my takes on it is here:

    http://www.chessedinburgh.co.uk/chandlerarticle.php?ChandID=399

    All three games, what Najdorf said to Geller after he sacced on e6
    (Geller was the first to sac. Keres and Spassky saw the sac on the huge demo
    boards, like what they saw, returned to the board and sacced on e6!)

    ""Your game is lost, we have all this analysed." Then came Bb5!
  5. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    27 May '11 19:39
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Hi Will

    Good to see you took it on the chin.
    As I said when you are in the grooove you do well, it's just annoying
    to look at those couple of vids knowing you could do better.

    Those minutes are precious, one should should (in my opinion) prepare
    them like a book. What game you are going to show, what you are going
    to say and what parts of the ...[text shortened]... oard and sacced on e6!)

    ""Your game is lost, we have all this analysed." Then came Bb5!
    Pretty good GP. You might can the corny accent though. Try and sound like an American.
  6. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    27 May '11 20:52 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Hi Will

    Good to see you took it on the chin.
    As I said when you are in the grooove you do well, it's just annoying
    to look at those couple of vids knowing you could do better.

    Those minutes are precious, one should should (in my opinion) prepare
    them like a book. What game you are going to show, what you are going
    to say and what parts of the oard and sacced on e6!)

    ""Your game is lost, we have all this analysed." Then came Bb5!
    Hi GP,

    At first I wasn't sure what you meant by "triangle", but I figured it out quick for the same reason you did- the position triggers the automatic chess classic recall mechanism.

    The difference in the States is that we usually refer to it as "The Gothenburg Trilogy", and once I translated the "triangle/trilogy" piece I knew exactly what you meant!

    I remember reading somewhere that Geller was the one who had the courage to make a decision and move, and that Spassky and Keres waited until after Geller moved to make their moves, such was their respect for his analytical abilities. Geller is easily one of the most unappreciated players of all time.

    For those who are unfamiliar with the subject, here is a very recent link to a business magazine that features the story:

    http://server2.interfuel.com/content.php?section=Sports&title=Sicilian-Gothenburg&id=31237
  7. 10 Jun '11 13:14
    Andrew Martin has produced one of chess training vids
    on this variation. Again very good and bringing you up to speed
    on the latest developments.

    YouTube