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  1. 24 Dec '14 00:41
    ...the number of Knights you can place on a chessboard
    without any of the Knights being able to take each other.

    This was a question on QI XL tonight.

    Answer

    32. The Knight always changes colour, so put 32 Knights on all the or light/dark squares.
  2. Subscriber 64squaresofpain On Vacation
    The drunk knight
    24 Dec '14 01:13
    Love that show

    The episode this puzzle is from is quite fittingly called 'Knights and Knaves',
    here's a link to watch it:
    YouTube

    And quite happily, I knew the answer within 10 seconds
  3. 24 Dec '14 09:34
    Nice puzzle! I feel it teaches something about the value of knights versus the other pieces.

    Compare these numbers:
    - 32 knights can be placed without interference
    - 14 bishops: 7 light + 7 dark (please check this number, but I'm quite certain)
    - 8 rooks
    - 8 queens
  4. 24 Dec '14 16:14 / 2 edits
    Hi tvochess,



    What about the Kings? How many Kings can you place on a board
    without them attacking each other.

    The Knight is the only piece restriced to where it moves. It's move never
    changes. It always has a pre-determinded destination which can range from
    eight to two squares depending where on the board it is placed.

    Even the King can castle and pawns take different from the way they move.

    The Rook on a clear board is the only piece not restricted by the corners
    or the a & h-files. No matter where you place it, it will always control 14 squares.

    Question 2.

    Blindfold yourself and using a genuine Staunton Set design take out one
    White Rook, One Black Rook, One White Knight and One Black Knight.
    How can you do this without making a mistake? (for intance removing
    two Black Rooks.)

    The time for this one is 2 seconds. You either know this or you don't.
  5. 24 Dec '14 17:29
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    What about the Kings? How many Kings can you place on a board
    without them attacking each other.
    At least
    16. Four on the black A squares, four on the black C's, and ditto on E and F
    . It may be possible to add more by using a fishbone pattern, but I don't think it is.

    Question 2.

    Blindfold yourself and using a genuine Staunton Set design take out one
    White Rook, One Black Rook, One White Knight and One Black Knight.
    How can you do this without making a mistake? (for intance removing
    two Black Rooks.)

    In my case, simply by taking one each from the left hand box and one from the right. I presume you have a solution for when they're all on one box, where officially the ears and crenellations are notched differently, but I don't have an official match set at hand so I don't know.
  6. 24 Dec '14 22:03
    Question 2.

    Blindfold yourself and using a genuine Staunton Set design take out one
    White Rook, One Black Rook, One White Knight and One Black Knight.
    How can you do this without making a mistake? (for intance removing
    two Black Rooks.)

    The time for this one is 2 seconds. You either know this or you don't.[/b]
    Assuming that the pieces are correctly placed on the board, then remove the first two pieces from the top rank left and the two pieces from the bottom rank left. ( Top and bottom ranks right will achieve the same result ) They will be the Rook and Knight - colour selection is not a factor as they will be at opposite ends of the board and therefore of opposite colour.
  7. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    24 Dec '14 22:42
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Hi tvochess,

    [fen]1N1N1N1N/N1N1N1N1/1N1N1N1N/N1N1N1N1/1N1N1N1N/N1N1N1N1/1N1N1N1N/N1N1N1N1 w - - 0 1[/fen]

    What about the Kings? How many Kings can you place on a board
    without them attacking each other.

    The Knight is the only piece restriced to where it moves. It's move never
    changes. It always has a pre-determinded destination which can ran ...[text shortened]... ing
    two Black Rooks.)

    The time for this one is 2 seconds. You either know this or you don't.
    I would vote for 10, and if that be denied me, 64. Pieces of the same color do not attack each other.
  8. 25 Dec '14 11:05
    On an original Staunton set a Rook and Knight of each colour have
    a King symbol stamped into them. You can easily feel it.
    It's on top of the Rook and on the Knight's forehead.

    This is for notation purposes so you can tell the difference between
    the King's Rook/Knight and the Queen's Rook/Knight.
  9. 25 Dec '14 12:02
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    On an original Staunton set a Rook and Knight of each colour have
    a King symbol stamped into them. You can easily feel it.
    It's on top of the Rook and on the Knight's forehead.

    This is for notation purposes so you can tell the difference between
    the King's Rook/Knight and the Queen's Rook/Knight.
    What if the rooks or knights have swapped place? In normal descriptive notation, AIUI (which is reluctantly!), the rook now on the queen's side is the QR, the one on the starboard side is the KR, not the one which started on that side. This is necessary, because you may well have to annotate a position for which you don't know the move history, or for which (in a problem, for example) there isn't one in the first place.

    There's a more psychological reason to dislike such marking, too: it makes the player believe that there is a real, rather than merely positional, difference between the two equal pieces. That the King's Knight is somehow more active than the Queen's, who is more defensive - or v.v., it makes no difference. That way lies a rapid descent into madness.