1. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    04 Mar '08 15:213 edits
    What's so important about the number 137? There's a small hint at the bottom of this post.



































































    Hint: It has to do with chemistry and physics.
  2. Standard memberPBE6
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    04 Mar '08 15:36
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    What's so important about the number 137? There's a small hint at the bottom of this post.

    Hint: It has to do with chemistry and physics.
    It's the atomic number of the last classically stable element feynmanium (yet unobserved).
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    04 Mar '08 15:372 edits
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    [b]What's so important about the number 137? There's a small hint at the bottom of this post.
    [/b]you mean 1/137 ? 🙂
    I know, but I'll let others investigate by them selves.
  4. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    04 Mar '08 15:49
    Originally posted by PBE6
    It's the atomic number of the last classically stable element feynmanium (yet unobserved).
    That's what I was looking for.

    Why is 138 not classically stable?
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    04 Mar '08 16:501 edit
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    What's so important about the number 137? There's a small hint at the bottom of this post.
    .
    .
    .
    Hint: It has to do with chemistry and physics.
    It is prime! Further, it is a Twin Prime (139 is also prime) and, subsequently, a Chen Prime.
  6. Standard memberPBE6
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    04 Mar '08 17:02
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    That's what I was looking for.

    Why is 138 not classically stable?
    Apparently the fine structure constant is approximately 137.036, which figures into the following expression for classical (non-relativistic) electron speed:

    v = Z*c/137.036

    where Z is the atomic number of the element. When Z = 137, the speed is still slightly less than the speed of light, but if Z = 138 or more, the speed becomes superluminal. When you take relativistic effects into consideration, apparently 138 becomes OK too.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Element_137
  7. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    05 Mar '08 00:231 edit
    Originally posted by PBE6
    Apparently the fine structure constant is approximately 137.036, which figures into the following expression for classical (non-relativistic) electron speed:

    v = Z*c/137.036

    where Z is the atomic number of the element. When Z = 137, the speed is still slightly less than the speed of light, but if Z = 138 or more, the speed becomes superluminal. When you ...[text shortened]... s into consideration, apparently 138 becomes OK too.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Element_137
    There you go.

    Wait, what? 138 is ok after all?
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