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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    30 Jul '05 07:12

    Place a piece on an empty square, then White mates in 2.
  2. 30 Jul '05 08:08
    Isn't it already mate in 2 without extra pieces? Ng7-e8-c7 I'd say. If the mate has to be with the piece you place I'd go for Bishop on d7....from there Bd7-c8-b7 mate.
  3. 30 Jul '05 14:36
    I cannot do it!!!

    Placed a black Queen on B7 and now I am stuck.....
  4. 30 Jul '05 15:49 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by MikeXx2020
    Usually black moves aswell...
    Yes but it doesnt matter which move Black plays, because White will still do the moves i posted.

    I guess something is wrong though, because why would there be so many black pawns and all that. Makes no sense somehow
  5. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    30 Jul '05 17:12
    Originally posted by MikeXx2020
    h3-2-11=Q=...



    answer:

    pawn on h2

    Ng7-e8-c7#
    Placing a pawn on h2 results in an illegal position, because Black already has 8 pawns on the board.
  6. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    30 Jul '05 17:13
    Originally posted by crazyblue
    Isn't it already mate in 2 without extra pieces? Ng7-e8-c7 I'd say. If the mate has to be with the piece you place I'd go for Bishop on d7....from there Bd7-c8-b7 mate.
    Placing a Bishop on d7 results in an illegal position.
  7. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    30 Jul '05 17:14
    Originally posted by adramforall
    I cannot do it!!!

    Placed a black Queen on B7 and now I am stuck.....
    If the goal is for white to mate in 2, you should not give him such a powerful piece to contend with...
  8. 30 Jul '05 17:37
    Hey this gets too confusing for me because nobody seems to understand what the previous poster means lol

    I say 1. Ne8 h2 2. Nc7 mate. What speaks against that? (in that solution you can put any black or white piece almost anywhere on the board, as long as its legal and not near the kings and that)

    Why is a White bishop on d7 illegal?

    Why do some people want to put black pieces on the board, like Q@d7. or pawn@h2?

    Is it actually Whites turn after the piece (if its a White one) was placed?

    Questions, questions.....
  9. 30 Jul '05 19:20
    Originally posted by BigDoggProblem
    [fen]k6n/P3ppNp/pPK3pP/2p5/1pP3P1/6Pp/4PP2/8 w - - 0 1[/fen]
    Place a piece on an empty square, then White mates in 2.
    From the looks of it this would involve some retrograde analysis:
    The main question: How did the black pawn got to h3? Only possible route from d7 with four captures but then the white pawn at g4 came from g2 with two captures (at f3 and at g4), and the white pawn at g3 came from h2.
    I'll need to look at this more closely.
  10. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    31 Jul '05 05:06
    Originally posted by MikeXx2020
    well is mine right or what?...
    "what".

    Please read my reply to you earlier in the thread.
  11. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    31 Jul '05 05:10
    Originally posted by crazyblue
    Hey this gets too confusing for me because nobody seems to understand what the previous poster means lol

    I say 1. Ne8 h2 2. Nc7 mate. What speaks against that? (in that solution you can put any black or white piece almost anywhere on the board, as long as its legal and not near the kings and that)

    Why is a White bishop on d7 illegal?

    Why do some p ...[text shortened]... lly Whites turn after the piece (if its a White one) was placed?

    Questions, questions.....
    Why is a White bishop on d7 illegal?

    That's for you to find out. If you don't believe me, try to make a legal game that leads to the position.

    Why do some people want to put black pieces on the board, like Q@d7. or pawn@h2?

    I have no idea!

    Is it actually Whites turn after the piece (if its a White one) was placed?

    Yes, it will be white's turn after the piece is placed.
  12. 31 Jul '05 15:18 / 1 edit
    Now I would like to revise my previous statement:
    There are 16 pawns ergo no pawn was promoted. There are two knights so 11 of 12 missing pieces were captured /we have to determine what is the one that was not captured/. That is 5 Black and 6 White (see below).
    The pawn at h3 came through d7 with four captures of pieces (excluding the dark-squared bishop this leaves us with a knight, queen or rook left). The pawn at h6 came with four captures from d2 (so eight captures total until this moment, four White and four Black). Pawn at g4 came from h2 with one capture (a piece was captured at g3). Total of 9 captures so far (2 more left). Pieces left /excluding the two knights in the final position/ for White the dark squared bishop and another piece, for black the light squared bishop; the pawns at "a", "b"- files changed places through two captures from the Black side, so the piece that is left is the Black light squared Bishop. The only places from which it cannot prevent 1.Ne8 and 2.Nc7# by delivering check are "e8" and "a2", however the bishop cannot be placed at "e8" so it should be placed at the "a2" square.
    And so, unless I have miscalculated something, the mystery should be revealed.
  13. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    31 Jul '05 16:18
    Originally posted by ilywrin
    Now I would like to revise my previous statement:
    There are 16 pawns ergo no pawn was promoted. There are two knights so 11 of 12 missing pieces were captured /we have to determine what is the one that was not captured/. That is 5 Black and 6 White (see below).
    The pawn at h3 came through d7 with four captures of pieces (excluding the dark-squared bishop t ...[text shortened]... e "a2" square.
    And so, unless I have miscalculated something, the mystery should be revealed.
    What happends if you place the Bishop on h5?
  14. 31 Jul '05 16:59
    Originally posted by BigDoggProblem
    What happends if you place the Bishop on h5?
    Well, to be honest I have missed that option
    Assuming we have placed the bishop at "h5" and it is White to move, let's try to determine what was Black's last (legal) move? The Bishop and the knight and the pawn at c5 are sealed so the only viable option is either b5-b4 or a5xb4;
    Since axb4 is easily discarded (the White pawn must have reached the "a7" spot thus the "a"-file was unobstructed) it remains only b5-b4. But then there were two captures of light-squared White pieces (a6xb5, and b7xa6) while as I have concluded in my previous post there were a light-squared piece and the dark-squared bishop left from the White's side. So the position with the black Bishop at "h5" is illegal
    Does that sound right?
  15. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    31 Jul '05 19:44
    Originally posted by ilywrin
    Well, to be honest I have missed that option
    Assuming we have placed the bishop at "h5" and it is White to move, let's try to determine what was Black's last (legal) move? The Bishop and the knight and the pawn at c5 are sealed so the only viable option is either b5-b4 or a5xb4;
    Since axb4 is easily discarded (the White pawn must have reached the " ...[text shortened]... e's side. So the position with the black Bishop at "h5" is illegal
    Does that sound right?
    Yes, that's right.

    Good work.

    This problem was composed by T.R. Dawson in 1922.