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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    06 Sep '07 19:48
    What is the force needed to pull the slider out? Does it change?
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's about respect
    06 Sep '07 20:04
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    What is the force needed to pull the slider out? Does it change?
    Depends on where it is and how it's oriented. Do we need to worry about gravity?
  3. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    06 Sep '07 20:43
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Depends on where it is and how it's oriented. Do we need to worry about gravity?
    Considering it has to be pulled out 760 Kilometers, I would think it a bit easier if it were lying on the ground, Otherise you get either a 760,000 meter high building or a 760,000 meter hole in the ground so I think those particular directions of travel can be safely ruled out
    Which of course cancels out gravity, assuming the slider is on roller bearings and doesn't add much to the force required.
    Hey, its the year 1850 remember? They would have figured that much out all by themselves
  4. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's about respect
    06 Sep '07 20:53 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Considering it has to be pulled out 760 Kilometers, I would think it a bit easier if it were lying on the ground, Otherise you get either a 760,000 meter high building or a 760,000 meter hole in the ground so I think those particular directions of travel can be safely ruled out
    Which of course cancels out gravity, assuming the slider is on roller bearin ed.
    Hey, its the year 1850 remember? They would have figured that much out all by themselves
    Oh, right. Civil War and all that.

    Mythbusters showed that there were cruise missiles in the Civil War (well, sort of). Can we attach rockets to the slider?!

    In any case, the difference in force will be the difference in pressures inside and out. As the pressure inside lessens, the atmospheric pressure will become relatively stronger and stronger and it will get harder and harder to pull the plunger further to an asymptotic level of difficulty. I don't want to crank the numbers though.

    Setting this thing up on top of a really high mountain would lessen this particular problem but would make logistics a pain in the nuts.
  5. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    06 Sep '07 21:06
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Oh, right. Civil War and all that.

    Mythbusters showed that there were cruise missiles in the Civil War (well, sort of). Can we attach rockets to the slider?!

    In any case, the difference in force will be the difference in pressures inside and out. As the pressure inside lessens, the atmospheric pressure will become relatively stronger and stro ...[text shortened]... high mountain would lessen this particular problem but would make logistics a pain in the nuts.
    Mumble mumble, I don't hear any numbers
  6. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's about respect
    06 Sep '07 21:20
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Mumble mumble, I don't hear any numbers
    The asymptote would 1 atm*m^2.

    Happy?
  7. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    07 Sep '07 00:39
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    The asymptote would 1 atm*m^2.

    Happy?
    hehe, I get the feeling you MIGHT be able to figure it out
  8. 07 Sep '07 14:13
    Should the curvature of the earth be taken into account?
  9. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    07 Sep '07 14:36 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by Schumi
    Should the curvature of the earth be taken into account?
    Of course, how else will we cancel the effects of gravity So do you know how much force has to be applied to that one square meter slider?
    So here is another problem: you have to go out 760,000 meters with your slider, and you need to keep it on a tangent to the surface, how far about ground is the other end? One end is on the surface, so the length follows the tangent line. After they figured out that number, they figured, ok, lets try putting the CENTER of the machine on the surface and building it left and right from there. Now how high are the ends above ground? All that happened before they figured they could just make the whole thing into a big curve but what were those two numbers, the altitude of the one end if the other end was on the surface V the altitude of both ends if the center was on the surface?