1. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
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    20 Mar '14 10:57
    So we all know regular ice cubes can make water at 32 degrees F, zero degrees C and the heat of fusion keeping you from freezing.

    So instead of an ice cube say at zero degrees F, how cold would you have to make the ice cubes for a single ice cube, say 2X2X2 cm size to completely freeze a 300 ml glass of ice solid in one minute? The glass can be considered to be a perfect insulator so it is a 100% efficient operation as far as turning the glass of water cold vs the thermal properties of the ice.
  2. Joined
    26 Apr '03
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    28 Apr '14 04:51
    Could we assume the glass is a sphere and the ice cube is at the middle?
    (the problem is the rate at which the heat of fusion is removed from all the parts of the water, and they are all at different distances from the ice).
  3. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
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    14 May '14 16:27
    Originally posted by iamatiger
    Could we assume the glass is a sphere and the ice cube is at the middle?
    (the problem is the rate at which the heat of fusion is removed from all the parts of the water, and they are all at different distances from the ice).
    Sure, that works for me. Simplifies the saturation, eh.