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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. 04 Apr '12 17:18
    Does anyone know which compound has the most elements?
  2. 04 Apr '12 21:18
    Originally posted by Campaigner
    Does anyone know which compound has the most elements?
    Nope.
  3. 16 Apr '12 20:59
    Darn!
  4. 16 Apr '12 21:46 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Campaigner
    Does anyone know which compound has the most elements?
    It's likely to be a mineral if you allow ionic or semi-ionic compounds.

    One candidate is magbasite, KBa(Al,Sc)(Mg,Fe++)6Si6O20F2 which has nine different elements.

    Look around at:

    http://webmineral.com/chemical.shtml

    edit: Traskite (Ba,Ca)9(Fe++,Mn)2Ti2(SiO3)12(OH,Cl,F)6•6(H2O) has ten.

    edit: or CAN have that many.
  5. Standard member forkedknight
    Defend the Universe
    18 Apr '12 22:19
    This one's pretty complicated, also 10 elements:

    http://webmineral.com/data/Zirsilite-(Ce).shtml
  6. Subscriber Ponderable
    chemist
    19 Apr '12 12:55
    Originally posted by Campaigner
    Does anyone know which compound has the most elements?
    You need to define "compound".

    One definition counts only such assemblies as compounds which have chemical bonds between them. So this definition would exclude most minerals.

    One definition is only aksing after the structural homogenity and counts "ion compounds2 as compunds. However there won't be "molecules" of such "compounds"...

    A comparatively small compound with six sorts of atoms is Trisodium 4-carboxy-5-mercapto-3-hydroxy-isothiazole. You can probably halogenize it and add more atoms to it...
  7. 20 Apr '12 19:13
    There is no upper limit on the size of a chemical compound (DNA is a compound). You could theoretically have a carbon chain and attach different elements all along it with suitable arrangements of atoms to join them on.
  8. 21 Apr '12 09:19
    Originally posted by iamatiger
    There is no upper limit on the size of a chemical compound (DNA is a compound). You could theoretically have a carbon chain and attach different elements all along it with suitable arrangements of atoms to join them on.
    There's still an upper limit to the number of different elements you can attach, though. No matter how long your carbon backbone, in real life you're not allowed to chain dilithium or unobtainium to it.

    Richard
  9. 21 Apr '12 22:34 / 1 edit
    :-)
    The question was "which compound has the most unique elements?", not "is there any limit to the number of different elements that can be in one compound?"

    I was pointing out why think there is no unique compound with the most elements. Potentially all the elements with reasonably long half lives (to allow time to incorporate them) could be included in an infinite number of monster compounds, none of them with any name.
  10. 23 Apr '12 21:26
    Originally posted by forkedknight
    This one's pretty complicated, also 10 elements:

    http://webmineral.com/data/Zirsilite-(Ce).shtml
    Cool.

    I think the convention "(Ce, Na)3" in that chemical formula(Na,[ ])12(Ce, Na)3Ca6Mn3Zr3Nb(Si25O73)(OH)3(CO3).H2O means that there are in each crystal unit, three atoms that can be Ce3, Ce2Na, CeNa2, or Na3. So it could vary. Any mineralogists in the house?

    BTW to another poster: I think the question is broad enough to allow ionic or semi-ionic compounds (semi-ionic: e.g. sodium sulfate has the O covalently bonded to the S but the sulfate ion they form is ionically bonded to the Na. So in solution, the S-O bonds do not dissociate.)
  11. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's about respect
    28 Apr '12 23:00
    Originally posted by Campaigner
    Does anyone know which compound has the most elements?
    Captain Planet
  12. 03 May '12 15:04
    Bin Ladin's appeared to have been as it took quite a while to find it.