1. Joined
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    19 Feb '07 19:20
    As a part of your exercise regimen, you walk 2 miles on an indoor track. Then you jog at twice of your walking speed for another 2 miles. If the total time spent walking and jogging is 1 hour, find the walking and jogging rates and show your solution.
  2. Standard memberPBE6
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    19 Feb '07 19:46
    Originally posted by GinoJ
    As a part of your exercise regimen, you walk 2 miles on an indoor track. Then you jog at twice of your walking speed for another 2 miles. If the total time spent walking and jogging is 1 hour, find the walking and jogging rates and show your solution.
    Let "w" be the walking speed in miles/hour. Then:

    2/w + 2/(2*w) = 1

    3/w = 1

    w = 3 mph
  3. Joined
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    19 Feb '07 19:52
    3 mph and 6 mph
  4. Joined
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    19 Feb '07 20:131 edit
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    3 mph and 6 mph
    Correct.

    [edit] Show your work please.
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    19 Feb '07 20:22
    I'm retired 😀

    Vw x Tw = 2 => Tw = 2 / Vw

    Vj x Tj = 2
    Vj = 2 Vw => Vw x Tj = 1 => Tj = 1 / Vw

    Tw + Tj = 1 => 2 / Vw + 1 / Vw = 1 => Vw = 3 and Vj = 6
  6. Joined
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    19 Feb '07 20:25
    Originally posted by PBE6
    Let "w" be the walking speed in miles/hour. Then:

    2/w + 2/(2*w) = 1

    3/w = 1

    w = 3 mph
    Incorrect 😛, the answer is 3 and 6.

    SOLUTION:

    We'll use the basic Time= Distance/Speed formula.

    Let the speed (or walking or jogging rate) be x.

    a) 2/x = Walking Rate
    b) 2/2x = Jogging Rate
    c) 1 hour = Time

    So;

    2/x + 2/2x =1
    6/2x = 1
    x = 3
    2x = 6

    3 is the walking rate.
    6 is the jogging rate.
  7. Standard memberPBE6
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    19 Feb '07 20:27
    Originally posted by GinoJ
    Incorrect 😛, the answer is 3 [b]and 6.

    SOLUTION:

    We'll use the basic Time= Distance/Speed formula.

    Let the speed (or walking or jogging rate) be x.

    a) 2/x = Walking Rate
    b) 2/2x = Jogging Rate
    c) 1 hour = Time

    So;

    2/x + 2/2x =1
    6/2x = 1
    x = 3
    2x = 6

    3 is the walking rate.
    6 is the jogging rate.[/b]
    Although I did miss the part of the question where you asked for both speeds, I don't need a physics lesson. 😛
  8. Standard memberuzless
    The So Fist
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    20 Feb '07 18:041 edit
    Originally posted by GinoJ
    Incorrect 😛, the answer is 3 [b]and 6.

    SOLUTION:

    We'll use the basic Time= Distance/Speed formula.

    Let the speed (or walking or jogging rate) be x.

    a) 2/x = Walking Rate
    b) 2/2x = Jogging Rate
    c) 1 hour = Time

    So;

    2/x + 2/2x =1
    6/2x = 1
    x = 3
    2x = 6

    3 is the walking rate.
    6 is the jogging rate.[/b]
    Hey, what's the big idea?

    You haven't stated what your inertial frame is. Without a frame, you cannot judge time and motion since you have not proven whether or not free bodies exist.
  9. Joined
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    20 Feb '07 19:26
    Originally posted by uzless
    Hey, what's the big idea?

    You haven't stated what your inertial frame is. Without a frame, you cannot judge time and motion since you have not proven whether or not free bodies exist.
    ...and?
  10. Standard memberuzless
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    20 Feb '07 20:42
    Originally posted by GinoJ
    ...and?
    I suppose you could make an argument for locality being sufficiently small enough and application trumping derivation for the purposes of the equation.

    3 and 6
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