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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    28 Jan '06 19:44
    So I go, assume one pound per day, conservative estimate I think.
    so 6 billion pounds per day or times 365 which amounts to 2.2
    TRILLION pounds per year. That doesn't even count beer.
    So 2.2 Trillion pounds is 1 trillion KG, 1^12 Kilograms of food per year.
    Thats a lotta enchaladas.
  2. 28 Jan '06 23:02
    I wonder how it affects the rotation of earth....because these 10^12 kilogramms (you wrote 1^12 but i guess you meant 10^12 right?), is being transported from here to there all over the world so the center of mass is changing all the time. I had to think of that, because i recently heard, that when its autumn in one part of the world and all the leaves fall down, that also changes the rotation (can anyone confirm that?).

    what is also interesting is that mass of earth is 6*10^24 kilo. this means we eat almost half of earth's weight every year. maybe we have to recalculate your result there. but still funny thought somehow. lets just hope earth is still here in 2 years
  3. 29 Jan '06 15:02
    Would be a good point, but 1^12 is not half of 1^24...
  4. 29 Jan '06 15:17
    Originally posted by crazyblue
    when its autumn in one part of the world and all the leaves fall down, that also changes the rotation (can anyone confirm that?).
    Well, when we have autumn in the northern hemisphere they have spring in the southern hemisphere, and vice versa, so this equals out rather efficiently.
    So I can't confirm that, sorry.
  5. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 Jan '06 16:55
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Well, when we have autumn in the northern hemisphere they have spring in the southern hemisphere, and vice versa, so this equals out rather efficiently.
    So I can't confirm that, sorry.
    Another thing. There is this big environmental concern about
    cow burps, producing methane, a greenhouse gas 20 times
    more greenhousie than CO2. What about HUMAN burps?
    and human farts. Surely 6 billion burping and farting humans
    have to be taking a toll on the atmosphere.
  6. 29 Jan '06 16:59
    Originally posted by shunter7634
    Would be a good point, but 1^12 is not half of 1^24...
    omg, how embarrassing. i knew there had to be something wrong hehe
  7. 29 Jan '06 17:39
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    ... burps, producing methane, a greenhouse gas 20 times
    more greenhousie than CO2. What about HUMAN burps?
    I don't think burps generate methane, not from cows, nor from people, perhaps from dragons.

    On the other hand, farts produce methane. But this is so small amount that it doesn’t really matter. As my doctor said: "Fabian, don't be embarrassed, farts is only natural" and how could natural things hurt nature?

    But again - perhaps it was just that who killed the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, they farted to much?
  8. 29 Jan '06 18:31
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Well, when we have autumn in the northern hemisphere they have spring in the southern hemisphere, and vice versa, so this equals out rather efficiently.
    So I can't confirm that, sorry.
    But there is a lot more land in the Northern hemisphere than there is in the Southern hemisphere, so the effects on the Earth's rotation caused by the Northern hemisphere are not countered by the Southern hemisphere.
  9. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 Jan '06 18:55
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    I don't think burps generate methane, not from cows, nor from people, perhaps from dragons.

    On the other hand, farts produce methane. But this is so small amount that it doesn’t really matter. As my doctor said: "Fabian, don't be embarrassed, farts is only natural" and how could natural things hurt nature?

    But again - perhaps it was just that who killed the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, they farted to much?
    I know for a fact that cow burps are mostly methane, comes
    from digesting vegation. So maybe human vegans generate more
    gas than we thought....
  10. 29 Jan '06 19:11
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    So maybe human vegans generate more
    gas than we thought....
    Perhaps this can explain my bad breath...
    And also why I only find friends to play chess with on internet...?
  11. 29 Jan '06 21:41
    Originally posted by crazyblue
    I wonder how it affects the rotation of earth....because these 10^12 kilogramms (you wrote 1^12 but i guess you meant 10^12 right?), is being transported from here to there all over the world so the center of mass is changing all the time. I had to think of that, because i recently heard, that when its autumn in one part of the world and all the leaves fall down, that also changes the rotation (can anyone confirm that?).
    "i recently heard, that when its autumn in one part of the world and all the leaves fall down, that also changes the rotation (can anyone confirm that?)"

    Well the leaves would have the same mass on the floor as on the tree so I don't see who this would effect it at all.

    I don't think many of these effects would be anything compared to the tides think of the massive weight of all the water shifting around the globe.

    Oh and methane can be produced by fermentation in anaerobic situations.
  12. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    30 Jan '06 04:03
    Originally posted by Will Everitt
    "i recently heard, that when its autumn in one part of the world and all the leaves fall down, that also changes the rotation (can anyone confirm that?)"

    Well the leaves would have the same mass on the floor as on the tree so I don't see who this would effect it at all.

    I don't think many of these effects would be anything compared to the tides th ...[text shortened]... around the globe.

    Oh and methane can be produced by fermentation in anaerobic situations.
    Actually, planetary scientists have figured out one thing that
    effects the earth, one factor in generating earthquakes:
    The atmosphere. The actual weight and force of the air has been
    proven to have an effect on generating earthquakes. Remember,
    the continental crust is rather thin compared to the whole mass of
    the earth and the atmosphere sloshes around considerably
    and exerts a downward force at times, also at times a lesser force,
    which is one element in the stirring up of continents. Just thin air
    is more forceful than we once thought.
  13. 30 Jan '06 07:49
    wtf? i come here hoping for some chess quizzes and stuff and i hear scientists talking about roation of the earth and consumption of food?!
  14. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    30 Jan '06 10:43
    Originally posted by This is Marty
    wtf? i come here hoping for some chess quizzes and stuff and i hear scientists talking about roation of the earth and consumption of food?!
    So do you know about the chess term 'Space Points'? There, I
    asked a chess question. Anyway there is a thread called 'only chess'.
  15. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    30 Jan '06 17:32
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    So I go, assume one pound per day, conservative estimate I think.
    so 6 billion pounds per day or times 365 which amounts to 2.2
    TRILLION pounds per year. That doesn't even count beer.
    So 2.2 Trillion pounds is 1 trillion KG, 1^12 Kilograms of food per year.
    Thats a lotta enchaladas.
    Of course, this begs the question of how much crap we produce everyday. But I don't want to get my hands dirty with that one...