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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    28 Sep '05 23:48
    Got this brainstorm or at least brainsneeze:
    You get more bang for your buck in electric heating by using a
    heat pump. I think you get three watts of heating for every one
    watt of electricity it takes to run the mechanism. Heat pumps can
    be like an air conditioner run backwards, it cools the outside air
    but heats the inside or another variation is using buried water pipes
    which picks up heat from underground and pumps it into the house.
    I was thinking what if you powered a heat pump with solar cells.
    Wouldn't you in effect be increasing the output of the cells if you
    use them to power a heat pump? If you have say, 10,000 watts of
    solar cells going into a heat pump and you get 30,000 watts of heat
    it looks like you get an effective jump in power efficiency from, say,
    20 % to 60%. 10,000 watts of heat is about 30,000 BTU so
    30,000 watts of heat would be nearly 100,000 BTU's of heat.
    What do you think, all you engineer types out there?
  2. Standard member XanthosNZ
    Cancerous Bus Crash
    29 Sep '05 04:49
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Got this brainstorm or at least brainsneeze:
    You get more bang for your buck in electric heating by using a
    heat pump. I think you get three watts of heating for every one
    watt of electricity it takes to run the mechanism. Heat pumps can
    be like an air conditioner run backwards, it cools the outside air
    but heats the inside or another variation is us ...[text shortened]... at would be nearly 100,000 BTU's of heat.
    What do you think, all you engineer types out there?
    Got this brainstorm or at least brainsneeze:
    You get more bang for your buck in electric heating by using a heat pump. I think you get three watts of heating for every one watt of electricity it takes to run the mechanism. Heat pumps can be like an air conditioner run backwards, it cools the outside air but heats the inside or another variation is using buried water pipes which picks up heat from underground and pumps it into the house. I was thinking what if you powered a heat pump with solar cells. Wouldn't you in effect be increasing the output of the cells if you use them to power a heat pump? If you have say, 10,000 watts of solar cells going into a heat pump and you get 30,000 watts of heat it looks like you get an effective jump in power efficiency from, say, 20 % to 60%. 10,000 watts of heat is about 30,000 BTU so 30,000 watts of heat would be nearly 100,000 BTU's of heat. What do you think, all you engineer types out there?
  3. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Proud Boys Beware
    29 Sep '05 07:01 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Got this brainstorm or at least brainsneeze:
    You get more bang for your buck in electric heating by using a
    heat pump. I think you get three watts of heating for every one
    watt of electricity it takes to run the mechanism. Heat pumps can
    be like an air conditioner run backwards, it cools the outside air
    but heats the inside or another variation is us ...[text shortened]... at would be nearly 100,000 BTU's of heat.
    What do you think, all you engineer types out there?
    What is the efficiency for changing heat into electricity or the chemical potential energy of a battery? That is, can you get better than 33% efficiency changing the heat from the pump to usable energy?

    Looks like it's been done.

    http://www.cogeneration.net/solar_electric_heat_pump.htm
  4. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 Sep '05 09:13
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    What is the efficiency for changing heat into electricity or the chemical potential energy of a battery? That is, can you get better than 33% efficiency changing the heat from the pump to usable energy?

    Looks like it's been done.

    http://www.cogeneration.net/solar_electric_heat_pump.htm
    Hey, thanks for the link. It didn't cover my idea exactlly but it did
    prove the point that I COULD use solar power to power a heat pump
    to get more efficient heat generation than simply feeding the power
    generated by the solar panels to a regular electric heater.