Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. my head
    Joined
    03 Oct '03
    Moves
    671
    15 Mar '05 15:45
    mathworld is a great sight if you want a clarification of something, or you want to understand something simpler, but is there a conviengnt startigy for using it to teach yourself compleatly new material?
  2. Joined
    29 Feb '04
    Moves
    22
    15 Mar '05 15:562 edits
    It is more for reference than for learning new stuff.
    For that, you could try
    http://mathforum.org/
  3. DonationAcolyte
    Now With Added BA
    Loughborough
    Joined
    04 Jul '02
    Moves
    3790
    16 Mar '05 00:48
    Originally posted by fearlessleader
    mathworld is a great sight if you want a clarification of something, or you want to understand something simpler, but is there a conviengnt startigy for using it to teach yourself compleatly new material?
    I don't know about learning from mathworld (though I agree it's very useful for formulae etc), but there are some obvious free sources of maths knowledge:
    - Wikipedia tends to be aimed at a general audience, so that might be a good place to look for a taster of unfamiliar concepts (ie it can answer questions like 'what the heck is Galois theory?'😉
    - university websites these days often have lecture notes, so you can read those and then have a go at the relevant practice/exam questions from the same course (if you can get at them - some uni sites are restricted access)
    - Many research papers are available on the internet, if you think you're up to it 😲
    - As with most things, there are internet forums out there dedicated to maths. Ask questions there and you might get more helpful and numerous replies than here.

    -finally, there's always good old libraries (especially university libraries, or libraries in studenty places) - books are not a bad way to learn maths by any means, though it's hard to know how useful a book will be until you have read some of it.