Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    27 Oct '07 12:31
    So you have a super Ken Jennings, knows all the answers to every question, is ten times faster to the button, and lucks out as if he knew where every double is, lets say for now, doubles only occur on the last two columns, (next to highest and highest paying questions), How much could Jennings have won? What was his percentage of the maximum he won, which I think was 2.5 mil over the course of 73 wins, but I think he won another half mil in a champions rematch so he won 3 mil total.
  2. Subscriber coquette
    Already mated
    27 Oct '07 16:44
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    So you have a super Ken Jennings, knows all the answers to every question, is ten times faster to the button, and lucks out as if he knew where every double is, lets say for now, doubles only occur on the last two columns, (next to highest and highest paying questions), How much could Jennings have won? What was his percentage of the maximum he won, which ...[text shortened]... se of 73 wins, but I think he won another half mil in a champions rematch so he won 3 mil total.
    apples and oranges. ken didn't know where the doubles were, so luck was involved. also, he was almost perfect, but not qutie.

    the maximum amount has no limit that can be calculated. that is, what would the tolerance of sponsors be for paying for a show in which there was no competition. imagine a quarter mile race. one person is driving one of those long skinny things that go faster than 200 miles per hour. everyone else has to run or ride a bicycle or ride a horse. how long would it take before everyone lost interest?
  3. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    27 Oct '07 17:13
    Originally posted by coquette
    apples and oranges. ken didn't know where the doubles were, so luck was involved. also, he was almost perfect, but not qutie.

    the maximum amount has no limit that can be calculated. that is, what would the tolerance of sponsors be for paying for a show in which there was no competition. imagine a quarter mile race. one person is driving one of those long ...[text shortened]... to run or ride a bicycle or ride a horse. how long would it take before everyone lost interest?
    Well, obviously this wouldn't happen in the real world, I am just asking what the max win could be under those circumstances as a maths problem, since one only needs to solve for one game, just assume he has supreme luck besides being a perfect trivia machine and gets the maximum doubles. That is in the realm of possibility for one game at least. Sounds calculable to me.
  4. 27 Oct '07 17:35
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    So you have a super Ken Jennings, knows all the answers to every question, is ten times faster to the button, and lucks out as if he knew where every double is, lets say for now, doubles only occur on the last two columns, (next to highest and highest paying questions), How much could Jennings have won? What was his percentage of the maximum he won, which ...[text shortened]... se of 73 wins, but I think he won another half mil in a champions rematch so he won 3 mil total.
    just to clarify, if we let the categories be A, B, C, D, E, and F, the daily doubles(DD) would be on the F-1000 dollar questions in the first round and F-1600 and F-2000 in double jeopardy correct?
    Super Ken Jenning always wagered everything on the daily doubles and final jeopardy correct?
    If that is the case then the maximum amount possible is $531,200.
    In Single Jeopardy with only one DD, each category is worth $3000 except for the last category, containing the DD, which is worth $2000 excluding the daily double. This gives him $17000 to wager on the DD, so he ends the round with $34000.
    In double jeopardy, every category is worth $6000 except the last which is only worth $2400. He gets $32400 from the non DD questions. Added to his previous total of $34000, he has a total of $66400. He wagers it all on the 2 daily doubles and final jeopardy, giving him $66400x2x2x2 which is $531,200.
    Which is 21.248% of what Ken jennings won during his streak.
  5. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    27 Oct '07 18:41
    Originally posted by Arachnarchist
    just to clarify, if we let the categories be A, B, C, D, E, and F, the daily doubles(DD) would be on the F-1000 dollar questions in the first round and F-1600 and F-2000 in double jeopardy correct?
    Super Ken Jenning always wagered everything on the daily doubles and final jeopardy correct?
    If that is the case then the maximum amount possible is $531, ...[text shortened]... im $66400x2x2x2 which is $531,200.
    Which is 21.248% of what Ken jennings won during his streak.
    I think more explicitly it should be 21% divide by 73, or 0.29% of what he could have won theoretically then, $38,777,600 which is what you could win in 73 games using your figures.
  6. 27 Oct '07 23:28
    Originally posted by Arachnarchist
    the daily doubles(DD) would be on the F-1000 dollar questions in the first round and F-1600 and F-2000 in double jeopardy correct?
    Put the Daily Double in the first round on a $800 question and two of the $1600 questions in the second round to get the max.
  7. 29 Oct '07 01:39
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I think more explicitly it should be 21% divide by 73, or 0.29% of what he could have won theoretically then, $38,777,600 which is what you could win in 73 games using your figures.
    Sorry I misunderstood that portion of the question.