Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
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    12 Dec '10 17:03
    I don't Google anymore.

    I just as ask you guys.

    Blog 4
  2. Joined
    29 Aug '10
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    12 Dec '10 19:40
    coz of the way it spinz
  3. e4
    Joined
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    12 Dec '10 22:322 edits
    OK you look at Earth from the North Pole it spins counter clockwise.

    You look at Earth from South Pole it spins clockwise.

    So there must a point when you look at it side on
    that it spins between clockwise and counter clockwise. (mid-clockwise)

    This is where you will find the East and West poles.

    I just want to know where they are.
  4. Joined
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    12 Dec '10 22:43
    but its flat, isn't it?
  5. Joined
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    12 Dec '10 23:16
    42
  6. Subscriberjoe shmo
    Strange Egg
    podunk, PA
    Joined
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    13 Dec '10 03:01
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    OK you look at Earth from the North Pole it spins counter clockwise.

    You look at Earth from South Pole it spins clockwise.

    So there must a point when you look at it side on
    that it spins between clockwise and counter clockwise. (mid-clockwise)

    This is where you will find the East and West poles.

    I just want to know where they are.
    Something is quite fishy with the logic. It implies that if you were to traverse the globe perpendicular to the rotation of the earth from south to north or visa-versa, there would exist at some point in the journey the appearance that the earth would not be rotating at all. Obviously thats not possible.

    This obviously is intertangled with a subtle change in perception of the "clockface" the human mind looks over if not careful.
  7. Standard memberIgloo
    Fishing
    In the icebucket
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    13 Dec '10 08:37
    The position of the "poles" of a rotating object is where the axis of rotation meets the surface of the object.

    This means that there are only two geographic poles on the planet.

    I'm not sure why the north pole is called the "north" pole, probably some arbitary definition.

    I do know that the poles of other planets are defined relative to earth's poles. Human egotism at its best.
  8. Joined
    18 Jan '07
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    13 Dec '10 14:48
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    OK you look at Earth from the North Pole it spins counter clockwise.

    You look at Earth from South Pole it spins clockwise.

    So there must a point when you look at it side on
    that it spins between clockwise and counter clockwise. (mid-clockwise)

    This is where you will find the East and West poles.
    Urg. I have a feeling that I'm being made a fool of, but I'll answer as if you seriously did not know this anyway.

    No, that's not where you will find any pole at all. That's where you will find the entirety of the equator. From a geological and/or geometrical point of view, no single point on the equator is different, directionally speaking, from any other. Nor is any point on the arctic circle different from the others. All points on any parallel is different to any other point on the same parallel. Only the two poles are unique, because at those points the parallels are reduced to those single points.
    From the earth's POV, east and west are directions, not points. The existence of the Greenwich meridian is entirely for political and navigational convenience; it has no basis in physics or mathematics. It's just been picked, semi-randomly, by humans.

    Richard
  9. e4
    Joined
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    13 Dec '10 15:011 edit
    OK I understand that.

    But in the olden days before Newton, everyone thought the Universe
    went around the planet so then the planet must have stood still.

    So before Newton somehow started spinning the planet where
    were the East and West Poles?
  10. Joined
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    13 Dec '10 15:21
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    OK I understand that.

    But in the olden days before Newton, everyone thought the Universe
    went around the planet so then the planet must have stood still.

    So before Newton somehow started spinning the planet where
    were the East and West Poles?
    Ah, well, that's even easier. All four poles were far out in the Ocean, the North one beyond Ultima Thule, the South one the other side of Africa, the West one outside the Gates of Hercules, and the East one somewhere off the coast of Cathay.

    Richard
  11. e4
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    13 Dec '10 23:04
    Thanks mate.

    Glad we got that one sorted out.
  12. Joined
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    14 Dec '10 10:54
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    OK you look at Earth from the North Pole it spins counter clockwise.

    You look at Earth from South Pole it spins clockwise.

    So there must a point when you look at it side on
    that it spins between clockwise and counter clockwise. (mid-clockwise)

    This is where you will find the East and West poles.

    I just want to know where they are.
    I have a digital clock. And the Earth doesn't spin like mine at all.
  13. e4
    Joined
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    14 Dec '10 11:09
    I guess proper clocks go clockwise because the
    sundial goes clockwise.

    I have often suspected that the digital clock/watch
    does not keep the correct time.

    I conducted my own experiment.

    I went around my work place and asked everyone
    who wore a digital watch for the time.

    And everytime I got a different answer.
  14. Joined
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    14 Dec '10 15:07
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    I guess proper clocks go clockwise because the
    sundial goes clockwise.
    As far as I know, you are quite correct.

    I have often suspected that the digital clock/watch
    does not keep the correct time.

    I conducted my own experiment.

    I went around my work place and asked everyone
    who wore a digital watch for the time.

    And everytime I got a different answer.


    You should've come to me. I have a watch with both a digital and an analogue display, and the digital one does not show the same time as the analogue one. It isn't even within a few minutes. (And yes, this is intentional.)

    Richard
  15. Standard memberPalynka
    Upward Spiral
    Halfway
    Joined
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    14 Dec '10 18:18
    How do you turn a roasting suckling pig on a spit?
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