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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. 20 May '04 10:28

    Fill in the blanks in the sentences below so as to make it correct. You must use words for numbers and not numerals(e.g. use 'one' for
    1 , 'two' for 2 etc.)
    (a) The sentence you are reading has ....... a's, ......e's, ..... i's,
    .......o's and ......u's.
    (b) This sentence has .....a's, ....e's, ....i's, ......o's and ....u's.
    When you really fet down to solve it surprisizingly you will find that between (a) and (b) only one is solvable; the other is not. Which one is it? Why is the other one not solvable?.
  2. Standard member TheMaster37
    Kupikupopo!
    20 May '04 18:29
    Originally posted by rspoddar82

    Fill in the blanks in the sentences below so as to make it correct. You must use words for numbers and not numerals(e.g. use 'one' for
    1 , 'two' for 2 etc.)
    (a) The sentence you are reading has ....... a's, ......e's, ..... i's,
    .......o's and ......u's.
    (b) This sentence has .....a's, ....e's, ....i's, ......o's and ....u's.
    Whe ...[text shortened]... b) only one is solvable; the other is not. Which one is it? Why is the other one not solvable?.
    The sentence you are reading has FIVE a's, FIFTEEN e's, FOUR i's,
    THREE o's and THREE u's.

    On the other one, you keep changing the number of E's resp I's; change the one, then the other changes again.
  3. 26 May '04 12:17
    yes ,U have solved(a) right. But why is the puzzle (b) not solvable?
  4. Standard member kingofthe303
    Wormtongue
    26 May '04 15:52
    I only count 14 e's. Am I missing something (apart from another E that is!!)
  5. 26 May '04 16:13 / 2 edits
    TheMaster's answer to (a) is all wrong. The only correct one is the number of o's.
  6. 06 Jun '04 16:33
    Originally posted by piderman
    TheMaster's answer to (a) is all wrong. The only correct one is the number of o's.
    actually the correct answer is:
    " the sentence you are reading has five a's, thirteen e's , five i's,
    three o's and two u's. "
    That 's the correct answer solution for the poser (a).
    The question remains - why is (b) unsolvable?
  7. 06 Jun '04 16:37
    I am sorry to have congratulated you prematurely. Your answer is all wrong. The correct solution for (a) is : -
    " The sentence you are reading has five a's, thirteen e's, five i's,
    three o's and two u's. "
    But the question remains - why is (b) unsolvable?
  8. 07 Jun '04 11:02
    Originally posted by rspoddar82
    I am sorry to have congratulated you prematurely. Your answer is all wrong. The correct solution for (a) is : -
    " The sentence you are reading has five a's, thirteen e's, five i's,
    three o's and two u's. "
    But the question remains - why is (b) unsolvable?
    why? Why do you assume a problem is unsolvable if you could not find its solution?
    Even (b) is solvable!
    Here is the solution.
    " THIS SENTENCE HAS THREE A's, TEN E's, TWO I's, THREE O's
    AND ONE U's. "
  9. 07 Jun '04 16:47 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by rspoddar82

    Fill in the blanks in the sentences below so as to make it correct.
    That's why your answer to (b) is not correct, Ranjan: "... and one u's" is not a correct English sentence.
  10. 08 Jun '04 16:09
    Originally posted by piderman
    That's why your answer to (b) is not correct, Ranjan: "... and one u's" is not a correct English sentence.
    perhaps piderman has a point. Only this grammatic impropriety makes it unsolvable. Is this so? Otherwise the problem is solvable as far as numbers of the vowels in the sentence is concerned.
    any takers for this argument? It is only a minor point- I think.am i wrong?
  11. 11 Jun '04 16:26
    Originally posted by ranjan sinha
    perhaps piderman has a point. Only this grammatic impropriety makes it unsolvable. Is this so? Otherwise the problem is solvable as far as numbers of the vowels in the sentence is concerned.
    any takers for this argument? It is only a minor point- I think.am i wrong?
    puzzles of syntax cannot be treated or analysed like those of mathematics. Ranjan , that is why you are wrong.
  12. 29 Oct '04 18:52
    Originally posted by rspoddar82
    puzzles of syntax cannot be treated or analysed like those of mathematics. Ranjan , that is why you are wrong.
    Then what is the correct solution?
  13. 31 Oct '04 07:40 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sarathian
    Then what is the correct solution?
    Puzzle (b) is unsolvable on account of the "quantum" character of the interplay of grammar and mathematics. The missing values to be filled in the blank make quantum jumps.
  14. 31 Oct '04 08:05 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by howzzat
    Puzzle (b) is unsolvable on account of the "quantum" character of the interplay of grammar and mathematics. The missing values to be filled in the blank make quantum jumps.
    But these quantum jumps are not unpredictable. They follow a definite rule (albeit not mathematical, but the rules of syntax and grammar). Therefore this should be solvable.
  15. 04 Nov '04 16:06
    Originally posted by ranjan sinha
    But these quantum jumps are not unpredictable. They follow a definite rule (albeit not mathematical, but the rules of syntax and grammar). Therefore this should be solvable.
    No..it is not quantum jump ....The jump is deterministic.

    Anything that is deterministic cannot be quantum.