1. Subscriberjoe shmo
    Strange Egg
    podunk, PA
    Joined
    10 Dec '06
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    7733
    04 Mar '10 04:162 edits
    I'm just stuck on a problem

    the problem is asking for the power supplied by the motor at a certain time t.

    The force the motor supplies is a function of time

    F = F(t)

    and

    P = Fv

    am I in the right ballpark for logic

    F(t) = ma

    a = F(t)/m = dv/dt

    v= Int[(F(t)/m)dt] = v(t)

    Then P(t) = v(t)* F(t)

    ??

    The problem incorporates some pulleys and friction, but I didn't want to go into that if my logic is flawed from the get go.
  2. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    West Coast Rioter
    tinyurl.com/y7loem9q
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    24791
    05 Mar '10 14:411 edit
    You should offer up the problem.

    Are you trying to determine power as a function of time given that you know the force as a function of time?
  3. Subscriberjoe shmo
    Strange Egg
    podunk, PA
    Joined
    10 Dec '06
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    7733
    05 Mar '10 20:57
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    You should offer up the problem.

    Are you trying to determine power as a function of time given that you know the force as a function of time?
    ok

    a crate has a mass of 210 kg and rests on a(horizontal) surface for which the coefficients of static "s", and kinetic friction"k" are 0.4 & 0.3 respectivley

    If the motor M supplies a cable force of F = (8t^2 + 20)N , where t is in seconds, determine the power output developed by the motor when t = 7 s.

    This part you'll have to take my word

    let +x axis be to the left

    The FBD
    3T to the left (because of mechanical advantage of pulleys) and Friction force to right.

    sum Fy is not needed except for detrermination of Friction force which is just c(Fw)

    c stands for coefficient, and Fw force weight.

    there it is.
  4. Joined
    07 Sep '05
    Moves
    35068
    06 Mar '10 10:41
    Originally posted by joe shmo
    am I in the right ballpark for logic

    F(t) = ma

    a = F(t)/m = dv/dt

    v= Int[(F(t)/m)dt] = v(t)

    Then P(t) = v(t)* F(t)
    That looks the right approach to me.

    You'll have to factor in the fact that the initial force isn't enough to overcome friction, so work out the time where the mass will start moving first. But then what you're doing here should work.
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