1. Joined
    24 Sep '06
    Moves
    3736
    26 Aug '08 23:561 edit
    Somewhere in the universe live a peaceful race of things called quarks.

    They live on the planet of the quarks.

    These super intelligent little creatures were created through an unknown phenomena.

    These quarks currently live on what many Americans would call a football.

    Over the planets existence it has deflated to the minimum weight allowed by the NFL.

    These quarks have constructed an amazing spacecraft made out of the "pig skin."

    The spacecraft weighs 10000 times greater than the average quark.

    The average quark is physically identical to its distant cousin here on earth.

    What is the approximate escape velocity of this spacecraft manned by a crew of 19 quarks?

    Would the location on the planet of the quarks chosen as the designated take off position matter?

    What if the football was filled with mercury and the deflated football weighed 10 ounces?

    Use theoretical values for any unknowns.
  2. Joined
    18 Jan '07
    Moves
    6976
    27 Aug '08 08:53
    Originally posted by nihilismor
    Over the planets existence it has deflated to the minimum weight allowed by the NFL.

    These quarks have constructed an amazing spacecraft made out of the "pig skin."

    The spacecraft weighs 10000 times greater than the average quark.

    The average quark is physically identical to its distant cousin here on earth.
    These demands are wildly incompatible. Since 10000 of even the heaviest quark (the top quark) are the tiniest fraction of a gramme, the NFL players would have to be kicking vacuums for this to work.

    Richard
  3. Standard memberTheMaster37
    Kupikupopo!
    Out of my mind
    Joined
    25 Oct '02
    Moves
    20443
    27 Aug '08 11:49
    Originally posted by nihilismor
    Would the location on the planet of the quarks chosen as the designated take off position matter?
    Yes, the distance to the centre of gravity varies and with that the gravitational force.
  4. Joined
    24 Sep '06
    Moves
    3736
    27 Aug '08 15:31
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    NFL players would have to be kicking vacuums for this to work.

    Richard
    Richard,

    I don't understand what NFL players have to do with the planet of the quarks.

    It is my understanding that if it can be measured, it can be figured.

    I really thought this was going to be a simple problem.

    I think I may have made a mistake however:

    Is it possible to figure the mass of an NFL football filled with mercury without actually conducting the experiment?

    I don't think it is, and I doubt anyone here will go out of their way to weigh it.

    Perhaps it is possible to find the mass with the given estimate (probably not even close) of the deflated football versus one filled to standards.
  5. Joined
    24 Sep '06
    Moves
    3736
    27 Aug '08 15:34
    Here is a completely different question.

    Why will an aircraft climb more quickly then descend?
  6. Joined
    12 Sep '07
    Moves
    2668
    28 Aug '08 09:57
    I don't understand the question. I am however aware that sometimes a climb is faster when preceded by a dive. I don't know why.
  7. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52724
    28 Aug '08 10:34
    Originally posted by nihilismor
    Here is a completely different question.

    Why will an aircraft climb more quickly then descend?
    Possibly because when climbing you are going into less dense air and when during decent you are going into denser air and thus more drag.
  8. Joined
    18 Jan '07
    Moves
    6976
    29 Aug '08 11:25
    Originally posted by nihilismor
    I don't understand what NFL players have to do with the planet of the quarks.

    It is my understanding that if it can be measured, it can be figured.
    You specified that this spaceship weighed as much as an NFL football. You also specified that it weighed as much as 10000 quarks. Those two demands are incompatible. It's as simple as that: 10000 of even the heaviest quarks weigh a minute, immeasurably minute fraction of even the most deflated NFL football.

    Richard
  9. Standard memberPBE6
    Bananarama
    False berry
    Joined
    14 Feb '04
    Moves
    28719
    29 Aug '08 13:46
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    You specified that this spaceship weighed as much as an NFL football. You also specified that it weighed as much as 10000 quarks. Those two demands are incompatible. It's as simple as that: 10000 of even the heaviest quarks weigh a minute, immeasurably minute fraction of even the most deflated NFL football.

    Richard
    No, the planet weighs as much as a football, the spaceship the quarks built on its surface weighs as much as 10,000 quarks.
Back to Top