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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. 05 Apr '05 09:32
    Invalid FEN inserted - 8/3b4/k2p3P/1p1K3P/1P4r1/8/3R4/8/ w


    white to play and win
  2. 05 Apr '05 11:02 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    [fen]8/3b4/k2p3P/1p1K3P/1P4r1/8/3R4/8/ w[/fen]

    white to play and win
    This is a beautiful masterpiece. A pity that the first move is so obvoius:
    1.h7 Rg5+ 2.Kxd6 Rxh5 3.Kc7! Be6 4.Kb8! and wins (5.Rd6# )
    EDITED:
    Hmmm...my mistake. I've missed
    4...Bd5! 5.Rxd5 Rxd5 6.h8R!! (6.h8Q? Rd8+! 7.Qxd8 stalemate) 6...Rd6 7.Kc7! and wins.
  3. 05 Apr '05 12:21
    Originally posted by ilywrin
    This is a beautiful masterpiece. A pity that the first move is so obvoius:
    1.h7 Rg5+ 2.Kxd6 Rxh5 3.Kc7! Be6 4.Kb8! and wins (5.Rd6# )
    EDITED:
    Hmmm...my mistake. I've missed
    4...Bd5! 5.Rxd5 Rxd5 6.h8R!! (6.h8Q? Rd8+! 7.Qxd8 stalemate) 6...Rd6 7.Kc7! and wins.
    correct. As the title says, Troitski developed this minor promotion puzzle based on the Saavedra position.
  4. 05 Apr '05 12:34 / 1 edit
    I have seen another attempt to improve the Barbie-Saavedra's study:
    A study by M.Liburkin
    White to play and win
  5. 05 Apr '05 13:44
    Originally posted by ilywrin
    I have seen another attempt to improve the Barbie-Saavedra's study:
    A study by M.Liburkin
    White to play and win
    [fen]8/8/2P5/1Pr5/8/8/N7/k2K4 [/fen]
    Good one too. Who else takes a shot at it?
  6. Standard member Peakite
    Sais
    05 Apr '05 18:38 / 1 edit
    The small number of possible moes makes it a little clearer, I'll have a shot.

    Can't be a pawn move, either way the rook will take both of them without a problem.

    A king move and then Kxa2, so it can't be that.

    So the knight to move, and looks to be Nc1.

    If Rxb5, then white can safely advance the c-pawn, moving the rook back to the c-file sees Nb3+

    If Kb2, then Nd3+

    If Kb1 then white can play Kd2, next king move and the knight moves to fork both black pieces again.

    If black takes the pawn (after Kd2), I'm a little stuck there.
  7. 05 Apr '05 18:47
    Originally posted by Peakite
    The small number of possible moes makes it a little clearer, I'll have a shot.

    Can't be a pawn move, either way the rook will take both of them without a problem.

    A king move and then Kxa2, so it can't be that.

    So the knight to move, and looks to be Nc1.

    If Rxb5, then white can safely advance the c-pawn, moving the rook back to the c-file sees ...[text shortened]... fork both black pieces again.

    If black takes the pawn (after Kd2), I'm a little stuck there.
    1.Nc1 Rxb5 2.c7 what if now black plays Rd5+?
  8. Standard member Peakite
    Sais
    05 Apr '05 19:05
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    1.Nc1 Rxb5 2.c7 what if now black plays Rd5+?
    Nd3.

    Can't play Rc5, and if Rxd3+, white can play Kc2
  9. 05 Apr '05 19:38
    Originally posted by Peakite
    Nd3.

    Can't play Rc5, and if Rxd3+, white can play Kc2
    OK, and after Kc2, Rd5. What next?
  10. Standard member Peakite
    Sais
    05 Apr '05 19:54
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    OK, and after Kc2, Rd5. What next?
    c8=Q

    ........ Ra5
    Qh8+ Ka2
    Qb2++

    ........ Rc5+
    Qxc5

    ........ Rd2+
    Kxd2

    ........ Rd8
    Qa6++

    ........ Kb2 or any other rook move
    Qa8+/++ mate next move if not immediate
  11. 05 Apr '05 20:22
    Originally posted by Peakite
    c8=Q

    ........ Ra5
    Qh8+ Ka2
    Qb2++

    ........ Rc5+
    Qxc5

    ........ Rd2+
    Kxd2

    ........ Rd8
    Qa6++

    ........ Kb2 or any other rook move
    Qa8+/++ mate next move if not immediate
    of course, I was mixing things up. I meant, what if black plays Rd4 (not Rd5). To make sure, we are talking 1Nc1 Rxb5 2.c7 Rd5+ 3.Nd3 Rxd3 4.Kc2 Rd4.

    And once you answered that, what happens if black plays Rd5 (this time it is d5) after white's first move: 1.Nc1 Rd5+ (he doesn't take on b5).?
  12. Standard member Peakite
    Sais
    05 Apr '05 21:18
    The second one after Rd5+ Nd3 and play out as in the first, but white may have the extra pawn, making any win easier.

    5. Kb3 Rd3+ 6. Kc2 R(any) 7. c8=Q

    if 5. Kc3 Rd1 6. Kc2 Rd4 and it's back to the same position
  13. 06 Apr '05 07:03
    Originally posted by Peakite
    The second one after Rd5+ Nd3 and play out as in the first, but white may have the extra pawn, making any win easier.

    5. Kb3 Rd3+ 6. Kc2 R(any) 7. c8=Q


    if 5. Kc3 Rd1 6. Kc2 Rd4 and it's back to the same position
    a) "The second one after Rd5+ Nd3 and play out as in the first, but white may have the extra pawn, making any win easier."

    Don't think so: 1.Nc1 Rd5 2.Nd3? Rxd3+ 3.Kc2 Rd5 and now if
    4.c7 then Rc5+ followed by Rxc7 is enough for draw (at least)
    or if 4.Kc2 then simply Rxb5 is enough for draw.
    You have to find a different response to 1.Nd3 Rd5 to win

    b) "35. Kb3 Rd3+ 6. Kc2 R(any) 7. c8=Q"

    1.Nc1 Rxb5 2.c7 Rd5+ 3.Nd3 Rxd3 4.Kc2 Rd4! 5.Kb3? Rd3+ 6.Kc2 Rd4! 7.c8=Q? Rc4+! 8.Qxc4 stalemate

    c) "if 5. Kc3 Rd1 6. Kc2 Rd4 and it's back to the same position"

    1.Nc1 Rxb5 2.c7 Rd5+ 3.Nd3 Rxd3 4.Kc2 Rd4! 5.Kc3 Rd1+

    yes, with the same result as under b) .

    Still some work to do in both a) and b) variations. The a)-one is rather special

  14. 13 May '05 00:10
    a)2. Kc2 Rc5+(Rxb5 loses to Nb3+ c7) 3.Kd3 Rxc1 4.Kd4 Ka2 5.Kd5 Rb1 6.Kc5 Rc1+ 7.Kd6 Rb1 8.c7 Rxb5 9.c8Q
    b)c8R is obviously the winning move. After 5.c8R white threatens Ra8#.
    5...Ra4 6.Kb3! winning the rook as black can't defend it and his king at the same time.