Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Joined
    12 Mar '03
    Moves
    37891
    05 Apr '05 09:32
    Invalid FEN inserted - 8/3b4/k2p3P/1p1K3P/1P4r1/8/3R4/8/ w


    white to play and win
  2. Joined
    30 Oct '04
    Moves
    7797
    05 Apr '05 11:023 edits
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    [fen]8/3b4/k2p3P/1p1K3P/1P4r1/8/3R4/8/ w[/fen]

    white to play and win
    This is a beautiful masterpiece. A pity that the first move is so obvoius:
    1.h7 Rg5+ 2.Kxd6 Rxh5 3.Kc7! Be6 4.Kb8! and wins (5.Rd6# )
    EDITED:
    Hmmm...my mistake. I've missed
    4...Bd5! 5.Rxd5 Rxd5 6.h8R!! (6.h8Q? Rd8+! 7.Qxd8 stalemate) 6...Rd6 7.Kc7! and wins.
  3. Joined
    12 Mar '03
    Moves
    37891
    05 Apr '05 12:21
    Originally posted by ilywrin
    This is a beautiful masterpiece. A pity that the first move is so obvoius:
    1.h7 Rg5+ 2.Kxd6 Rxh5 3.Kc7! Be6 4.Kb8! and wins (5.Rd6# )
    EDITED:
    Hmmm...my mistake. I've missed
    4...Bd5! 5.Rxd5 Rxd5 6.h8R!! (6.h8Q? Rd8+! 7.Qxd8 stalemate) 6...Rd6 7.Kc7! and wins.
    correct. As the title says, Troitski developed this minor promotion puzzle based on the Saavedra position.
  4. Joined
    30 Oct '04
    Moves
    7797
    05 Apr '05 12:341 edit
    I have seen another attempt to improve the Barbie-Saavedra's study:
    A study by M.Liburkin
    White to play and win
  5. Joined
    12 Mar '03
    Moves
    37891
    05 Apr '05 13:44
    Originally posted by ilywrin
    I have seen another attempt to improve the Barbie-Saavedra's study:
    A study by M.Liburkin
    White to play and win
    [fen]8/8/2P5/1Pr5/8/8/N7/k2K4 [/fen]
    Good one too. Who else takes a shot at it?
  6. Berks.
    Joined
    27 Nov '04
    Moves
    41991
    05 Apr '05 18:381 edit
    The small number of possible moes makes it a little clearer, I'll have a shot.

    Can't be a pawn move, either way the rook will take both of them without a problem.

    A king move and then Kxa2, so it can't be that.

    So the knight to move, and looks to be Nc1.

    If Rxb5, then white can safely advance the c-pawn, moving the rook back to the c-file sees Nb3+

    If Kb2, then Nd3+

    If Kb1 then white can play Kd2, next king move and the knight moves to fork both black pieces again.

    If black takes the pawn (after Kd2), I'm a little stuck there.
  7. Joined
    12 Mar '03
    Moves
    37891
    05 Apr '05 18:47
    Originally posted by Peakite
    The small number of possible moes makes it a little clearer, I'll have a shot.

    Can't be a pawn move, either way the rook will take both of them without a problem.

    A king move and then Kxa2, so it can't be that.

    So the knight to move, and looks to be Nc1.

    If Rxb5, then white can safely advance the c-pawn, moving the rook back to the c-file sees ...[text shortened]... fork both black pieces again.

    If black takes the pawn (after Kd2), I'm a little stuck there.
    1.Nc1 Rxb5 2.c7 what if now black plays Rd5+?
  8. Berks.
    Joined
    27 Nov '04
    Moves
    41991
    05 Apr '05 19:05
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    1.Nc1 Rxb5 2.c7 what if now black plays Rd5+?
    Nd3.

    Can't play Rc5, and if Rxd3+, white can play Kc2
  9. Joined
    12 Mar '03
    Moves
    37891
    05 Apr '05 19:38
    Originally posted by Peakite
    Nd3.

    Can't play Rc5, and if Rxd3+, white can play Kc2
    OK, and after Kc2, Rd5. What next?
  10. Berks.
    Joined
    27 Nov '04
    Moves
    41991
    05 Apr '05 19:54
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    OK, and after Kc2, Rd5. What next?
    c8=Q

    ........ Ra5
    Qh8+ Ka2
    Qb2++

    ........ Rc5+
    Qxc5

    ........ Rd2+
    Kxd2

    ........ Rd8
    Qa6++

    ........ Kb2 or any other rook move
    Qa8+/++ mate next move if not immediate
  11. Joined
    12 Mar '03
    Moves
    37891
    05 Apr '05 20:22
    Originally posted by Peakite
    c8=Q

    ........ Ra5
    Qh8+ Ka2
    Qb2++

    ........ Rc5+
    Qxc5

    ........ Rd2+
    Kxd2

    ........ Rd8
    Qa6++

    ........ Kb2 or any other rook move
    Qa8+/++ mate next move if not immediate
    of course, I was mixing things up. I meant, what if black plays Rd4 (not Rd5). To make sure, we are talking 1Nc1 Rxb5 2.c7 Rd5+ 3.Nd3 Rxd3 4.Kc2 Rd4.

    And once you answered that, what happens if black plays Rd5 (this time it is d5) after white's first move: 1.Nc1 Rd5+ (he doesn't take on b5).?
  12. Berks.
    Joined
    27 Nov '04
    Moves
    41991
    05 Apr '05 21:18
    The second one after Rd5+ Nd3 and play out as in the first, but white may have the extra pawn, making any win easier.

    5. Kb3 Rd3+ 6. Kc2 R(any) 7. c8=Q

    if 5. Kc3 Rd1 6. Kc2 Rd4 and it's back to the same position
  13. Joined
    12 Mar '03
    Moves
    37891
    06 Apr '05 07:03
    Originally posted by Peakite
    The second one after Rd5+ Nd3 and play out as in the first, but white may have the extra pawn, making any win easier.

    5. Kb3 Rd3+ 6. Kc2 R(any) 7. c8=Q


    if 5. Kc3 Rd1 6. Kc2 Rd4 and it's back to the same position
    a) "The second one after Rd5+ Nd3 and play out as in the first, but white may have the extra pawn, making any win easier."

    Don't think so: 1.Nc1 Rd5 2.Nd3? Rxd3+ 3.Kc2 Rd5 and now if
    4.c7 then Rc5+ followed by Rxc7 is enough for draw (at least)
    or if 4.Kc2 then simply Rxb5 is enough for draw.
    You have to find a different response to 1.Nd3 Rd5 to win

    b) "35. Kb3 Rd3+ 6. Kc2 R(any) 7. c8=Q"

    1.Nc1 Rxb5 2.c7 Rd5+ 3.Nd3 Rxd3 4.Kc2 Rd4! 5.Kb3? Rd3+ 6.Kc2 Rd4! 7.c8=Q? Rc4+! 8.Qxc4 stalemate

    c) "if 5. Kc3 Rd1 6. Kc2 Rd4 and it's back to the same position"

    1.Nc1 Rxb5 2.c7 Rd5+ 3.Nd3 Rxd3 4.Kc2 Rd4! 5.Kc3 Rd1+

    yes, with the same result as under b) .

    Still some work to do in both a) and b) variations. The a)-one is rather special

  14. Joined
    01 May '05
    Moves
    390
    13 May '05 00:10
    a)2. Kc2 Rc5+(Rxb5 loses to Nb3+ c7) 3.Kd3 Rxc1 4.Kd4 Ka2 5.Kd5 Rb1 6.Kc5 Rc1+ 7.Kd6 Rb1 8.c7 Rxb5 9.c8Q
    b)c8R is obviously the winning move. After 5.c8R white threatens Ra8#.
    5...Ra4 6.Kb3! winning the rook as black can't defend it and his king at the same time.
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