Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    19 Jan '09 17:58
    You have a propellor attached to a shaft which is attached to an engine. You are a smart guy and realize that the centre of the propellor will be rotating at a slower speed than the outside edges of the propellor

    So, when calculating the minimum amount of power needed to turn the propellor 1 revolution/second, do you calculate how much power is required to turn the centre of the propellor at speed X, or do you calculate how much power is required to turn the outside of the propellor at speed y?
  2. 19 Jan '09 18:01
    Originally posted by uzless
    You have a propellor attached to a shaft which is attached to an engine. You are a smart guy and realize that the centre of the propellor will be rotating at a slower speed than the outside edges of the propellor

    So, when calculating the minimum amount of power needed to turn the propellor 1 revolution/second, do you calculate how much power is required t ...[text shortened]... or do you calculate how much power is required to turn the outside of the propellor at speed y?
    Does it matter wat you use? I think it won't change the amoun of power needed
  3. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    19 Jan '09 18:39 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by uzless
    You have a propellor attached to a shaft which is attached to an engine. You are a smart guy and realize that the centre of the propellor will be rotating at a slower speed than the outside edges of the propellor

    So, when calculating the minimum amount of power needed to turn the propellor 1 revolution/second, do you calculate how much power is required t ...[text shortened]... or do you calculate how much power is required to turn the outside of the propellor at speed y?
    You can sidestep the whole issue by calculating power as the product of torque and rotational speed:

    power = (2*pi) * torque * rotational speed

    In fact, I think it only makes sense to do it this way. The speed of the innermost part of the propeller and the outermost part of the propeller are related by the ratio v(inner)/v(outer)= 2*pi*r(inner) / 2*pi*r(outer) = r(inner)/r(outer), so you only need to define one variable (the rotational speed) in order to delineate the speed of any particular position on the propeller.
  4. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's about respect
    21 Jan '09 05:39
    Originally posted by uzless
    You have a propellor attached to a shaft which is attached to an engine. You are a smart guy and realize that the centre of the propellor will be rotating at a slower speed than the outside edges of the propellor

    So, when calculating the minimum amount of power needed to turn the propellor 1 revolution/second, do you calculate how much power is required t ...[text shortened]... or do you calculate how much power is required to turn the outside of the propellor at speed y?
    MY CLERICK IS LEVEL 6 AND HE CAN TURN ZOMBIES WITH HIS POWER NO ITS THE POWER OF HIS GOD APOLLO, GOD OF THE SUN AND ARROWS