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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Standard member bot 6
    Bla bla bla
    02 May '07 01:39
    i heard he was pretty cool, until the genocide thing...i also heard he was scitso....i also heard he was a speed freak, and heard voices. what do you think?
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's about respect
    02 May '07 04:49
    Interestingly, he was the child of incest. Four of his five siblings didn't make it to adulthood. He was heavily beaten as a child. After he took Austria, he obliterated his father's hometown by making it an artillary range. He was a high school dropout. After this, he lived on welfare and handouts from his mother, and later inheritance from his aunt and father. He was rejected from the art academy he wanted to go to. Eventually he had to go live in a shelter for the homeless. All this time he was trying to be a painter.

    He seems to have never worked an honest day's work in his life until he joined the Bavarian Army in 1914.

    He didn't seem to be a particularly admirable person for any reason except his charisma which was legendary.
  3. Standard member CalJust
    It is what it is
    02 May '07 07:43 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by bot 6
    i heard he was pretty cool, until the genocide thing...i also heard he was scitso....i also heard he was a speed freak, and heard voices. what do you think?
    Do you have the answer to this poser, before I struggle to solve the problem??



    (I suggest you post this on th Spirituality Forum, since the answer to this question has religious undertones.)
  4. 04 May '07 02:59
    As a matter of fact, there is no one answer to that question. IMHO he did terrible things, but all of them can be blamed on issues he met in his childhood. Actually, he wanted to become an artist, but then he was impressed into military during the WWI. He didn't have a choice really, his paintings were pretty awful.

    The only thing that I admire in him is his ability of public speaking. He was able to speak without any preparation in front of a huge crowd and pump them up that much that they were ready to stand up and die for him at any moment. He was an excellent speaker and a good leader, but his strategic and moral qualities needless to say just sucked.
  5. Standard member bot 6
    Bla bla bla
    05 May '07 17:32
    Originally posted by CalJust
    Do you have the answer to this poser, before I struggle to solve the problem??



    (I suggest you post this on th Spirituality Forum, since the answer to this question has religious undertones.)
    i disagree. im talking about a historical figure. how the hell is spirituality involved?
  6. Standard member bot 6
    Bla bla bla
    05 May '07 17:33
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Interestingly, he was the child of incest. Four of his five siblings didn't make it to adulthood. He was heavily beaten as a child. After he took Austria, he obliterated his father's hometown by making it an artillary range. He was a high school dropout. After this, he lived on welfare and handouts from his mother, and later inheritance from his aunt ...[text shortened]... o be a particularly admirable person for any reason except his charisma which was legendary.
    was there any history of mental illness with this guy?
  7. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    06 May '07 03:58
    Originally posted by bot 6
    i heard he was pretty cool, until the genocide thing...i also heard he was scitso....i also heard he was a speed freak, and heard voices. what do you think?
    Why don't you google 'the night of the long knives' and see if you still think he was cool. That horrible event happened long before he started murdering jews. It taught him about mass murder in 1934.
  8. 06 May '07 06:23 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Why don't you google 'the night of the long knives' and see if you still think he was cool. That horrible event happened long before he started murdering jews. It taught him about mass murder in 1934.
    "The events were very divisive in Canada. Many Québécois saw the deal as the English-speaking premiers stabbing Quebec in the back, which would prompt many Quebec nationalists to call it the "Night of the Long Knives." Many in English Canada saw Lévesque as trying to do the same to the English-speaking premiers by accepting the referendum. Jean Chrétien's role in the negotiations made him almost universally reviled among sovereignists."

    Found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriation.
  9. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's about respect
    06 May '07 06:39
    Originally posted by bot 6
    was there any history of mental illness with this guy?
    I found my information in the Wikipedia article. You can check there.
  10. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    06 May '07 18:02
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    "The events were very divisive in Canada. Many Québécois saw the deal as the English-speaking premiers stabbing Quebec in the back, which would prompt many Quebec nationalists to call it the [b]"Night of the Long Knives." Many in English Canada saw Lévesque as trying to do the same to the English-speaking premiers by accepting the referendum. Jean Chr ...[text shortened]... versally reviled among sovereignists."

    Found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriation.[/b]
    What connection is there between this Canadian thing and the long knives?
  11. 06 May '07 23:38
    Originally posted by Allderdice
    As a matter of fact, there is no one answer to that question. IMHO he did terrible things, but all of them can be blamed on issues he met in his childhood. Actually, he wanted to become an artist, but then he was impressed into military during the WWI. He didn't have a choice really, his paintings were pretty awful.

    The only thing that I admire in him ...[text shortened]... t speaker and a good leader, but his strategic and moral qualities needless to say just sucked.
    in correct, they can be blamed on his inability to deal with childhood troubles, not his childhood itself...
  12. 07 May '07 12:39
    Originally posted by rubberjaw30
    in correct, they can be blamed on his inability to deal with childhood troubles, not his childhood itself...
    Yeah, his childhood was full of terrible events. He was a child of an uncle and a niece, the uncle hated his like of artistism, and tried to make him love his own career that had smth to do with banking and finances - I am not sure. Once he actually burned a full album of his pictures and started beating Adolf every time he tried to draw anything. All his life the worst events were associated with his downfall and the triumph of the jews - e. g. he wasn't accepted to an art academy, instead a jew was. Once his commander promised the Iron Cross (high ranking German medal) ih he'd transfer a message between two nearby military stations during WWI. After doing so he returned for his 'prize' and got nothing. But the only thing that he learned after that was that the man that cajuled him was a jew. There were a lot of different events like that that help us undertand the idea behind his actions, or motives for such huge mass murders, but it doesn't prove his actions lawful from either moral or jurisdictual points of view.
  13. 07 May '07 22:38 / 1 edit
    He was an awesome public speaker, he could talk to an audience of 5 people, or 100 thousand people, and "imprint" them, making them his pawns. He would have made a great insurance or used car salesman. Or evangelist. Or politician.

    Oh...wait....he was a politician. Politicians suuuuuuuuuck.