Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. H. T. & E. hte
    Joined
    21 May '04
    Moves
    3510
    05 Jul '06 14:341 edit
    At the start, a mouse is at a distance 'D' to the north of a cat. The mouse starts running with a constant speed 'U' towards east. The cat starts running with a constant speed 'V' always directed towards the mouse. ( V > U ). Obviously the cat will catch the mouse in a finite time. Find an analytical expression for the time T required for the cat to catch the mouse in terms of U , V and D. The differential equation you will need may involve second order derivatives..... 😲🙄🙄
    Some guys say this is an unsolvable problem. But it has been analytically solved by.....
  2. Joined
    25 Jul '04
    Moves
    3205
    06 Jul '06 10:421 edit
    Originally posted by ranjan sinha
    At the start, a mouse is at a distance 'D' to the north of a cat. The mouse starts running with a constant speed 'U' towards east. The cat starts running with a constant speed 'V' always directed towards the mouse. ( V > U ). Obviously the cat will catch the mouse in a finite time. Find an analytical expression for the t ...[text shortened]... say this is an unsolvable problem. But it has been analytically solved by.....
    Will it be T = D / ( V - U ) ?
  3. Joined
    19 Jun '04
    Moves
    2930
    06 Jul '06 14:22
    If you just want the answer in YES or NO , then it is YES.
  4. Standard memberPalynka
    Upward Spiral
    Halfway
    Joined
    02 Aug '04
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    8702
    06 Jul '06 14:26
    Originally posted by sarathian
    Will it be T = D / ( V - U ) ?
    No.
  5. Joined
    25 Jul '04
    Moves
    3205
    06 Jul '06 14:33
    i withdraw my suggested answer. I wrongly assumed the cat and mouse
    both running in the same straight line. Sorry. The trajectory of the cat's path will be a complicated curve.. Palynka is right.
  6. B is for bye bye
    Joined
    09 Apr '06
    Moves
    27526
    06 Jul '06 14:35
    Originally posted by Palynka
    No.
    Correct.
  7. H. T. & E. hte
    Joined
    21 May '04
    Moves
    3510
    06 Jul '06 14:58
    Originally posted by sarathian
    Will it be T = D / ( V - U ) ?
    You are outrageously wrong... Simple arithmetic won't do. It involves calculus..
  8. at the centre
    Joined
    19 Jun '04
    Moves
    3257
    07 Jul '06 09:59
    Originally posted by ranjan sinha
    At the start, a mouse is at a distance 'D' to the north of a cat. The mouse starts running with a constant speed 'U' towards east. The cat starts running with a constant speed 'V' always directed towards the mouse. ( V > U ). Obviously the cat will catch the mouse in a finite time. Find an analytical expression for the t ...[text shortened]... say this is an unsolvable problem. But it has been analytically solved by.....
    Let L = distance between the cat and the mouse.
    S = distance traversed by the cat.
    Then S = V * T. If one could set up an expression for the
    derivative dL/dS , or dL/dT, the problem can be solved.
    At T = 0, S= 0 and L = D. Therefore the time T at which L = 0 will be the required solution. But I am not abe to set up the differential equation between L and S exclusive of other variables. Other variables appear intermingled and I don't know how to eliminate the other variables using the conditions of the problem. I am trying..
    When something comes up I will be back.
  9. Joined
    30 Oct '04
    Moves
    2295
    07 Jul '06 12:522 edits
    Originally posted by ranjan sinha
    At the start, a mouse is at a distance 'D' to the north of a cat. The mouse starts running with a constant speed 'U' towards east. The cat starts running with a constant speed 'V' always directed towards the mouse. ( V > U ). Obviously the cat will catch the mouse in a finite time. Find an analytical expression for the t ...[text shortened]... say this is an unsolvable problem. But it has been analytically solved by.....
    I have worked it out . My method is a bit lengthy. If my method is not wrong then:-
    The time taken by the cat to catch the mouse will be
    T = ( V * D ) / (V^2 - U^2).
    The distance S covered by the cat in cathing the mouse will be
    S = (V^2)*D /(V^2 - U^2).
  10. Joined
    19 Jun '04
    Moves
    2930
    07 Jul '06 14:16
    Originally posted by CoolPlayer
    I have worked it out . My method is a bit lengthy. If my method is not wrong then:-
    The time taken by the cat to catch the mouse will be
    T = ( V * D ) / (V^2 - U^2).
    The distance S covered by the cat in cathing the mouse will be
    S = (V^2)*D /(V^2 - U^2).
    Give the steps of your calculation...don't be weasel-like..
  11. Joined
    30 Oct '04
    Moves
    2295
    07 Jul '06 15:18
    See problem no. 1.13 of I.E.Irodov's "Problems in General Physics"..
    In the answer section the basic steps have been given.
  12. Joined
    11 Jun '06
    Moves
    3516
    07 Jul '06 15:39
    Originally posted by CoolPlayer
    See problem no. 1.13 of I.E.Irodov's "Problems in General Physics"..
    In the answer section the basic steps have been given.
    oh yes i have a copy of that handy i'll go look it up.😠
  13. at the centre
    Joined
    19 Jun '04
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    3257
    07 Jul '06 16:332 edits
    Originally posted by CoolPlayer
    See problem no. 1.13 of I.E.Irodov's "Problems in General Physics"..
    In the answer section the basic steps have been given.
    I looked up Irodov.
    Irodov seems to be wrong. Irodov has taken the instantaneous velocity of approach ( he has used 'convergence'😉 to be

    ( V - U cos a ),
    where 'a ' is the instantaneous angle between the directions of motion of the cat and the mouse.
    But the the instantaneous velocity of approach must be the instantaneous relative velocity of the cat w.r.t. the mouse.
    It should accordingly be

    SQRT (V^2 - 2 U V cos a + U^2).

    Irodov seems to be wrong.
    Either Irodov must be wrong or we have a contradiction.
  14. Joined
    19 Jun '04
    Moves
    2930
    07 Jul '06 17:33
    Originally posted by howzzat
    I looked up Irodov.
    Irodov seems to be wrong. Irodov has taken the instantaneous velocity of approach ( he has used 'convergence'😉 to be

    ( V - U cos a ),
    where 'a ' is the instantaneous angle between the directions of motion of the cat and the mouse.
    But the the instantaneous velocity of approach must be ...[text shortened]... v seems to be wrong.
    Either Irodov must be wrong or we have a contradiction.
    Irodov is an established authority in the world of academia.

    Be double-ly triple-ly sure before pointing fingers at such authorities on the subject..
  15. Standard memberPBE6
    Bananarama
    False berry
    Joined
    14 Feb '04
    Moves
    28719
    07 Jul '06 17:591 edit
    Originally posted by ranjan sinha
    Some guys say this is an unsolvable problem. But it has been analytically solved by.....
    Alan Curry --> http://mathproblems.info/group2.html (see problem #30)
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