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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    26 Apr '10 01:30
    "It's crackers to slip the rozzer dropsey insnide"
  2. 26 Apr '10 07:31
    I don't understand it
    Was it Grampy Bobby?
  3. 26 Apr '10 07:34
    'It's crackers to slip a rozzer the dropsy in snide' is good advice
  4. 26 Apr '10 09:28
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    "It's crackers to slip the rozzer dropsey insnide"
    "it's crackers " ..Meaning "stupid ,idiotic ,daft etc"
    "Rozzer"... A British term for a "cop,policeman "
    "Dropsey"...To give a " backhander ,Bribe ...etc"
    I would say its probably a "cockney " and i am going for ...."Lockstock and four smoking barrells "....?
  5. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    26 Apr '10 16:10
    Originally posted by phil3000
    "it's crackers " ..Meaning "stupid ,idiotic ,daft etc"
    "Rozzer"... A British term for a "cop,policeman "
    "Dropsey"...To give a " backhander ,Bribe ...etc"
    I would say its probably a "cockney " and i am going for ...."Lockstock and four smoking barrells "....?
    snide is funny money

    dont think its Lockstock ... rozzer is very old-fashioned slang
  6. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    26 Apr '10 17:02
    And a little research suggests that this is a MAD question.
  7. Standard member avalanchethecat
    Not actually a cat
    26 Apr '10 17:21 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    "It's crackers to slip the rozzer dropsey insnide"
    But a little more research reveals that:

    Magersfontein Lugg is a fictional character in the Albert Campion novels, written by Margery Allingham (1904-1966). Lugg, in The Fashion in Shrouds (originally published in 1938), is the originator of the curious sentence, "It's crackers to slip a rozzer the dropsy in snide". Mad Magazine just hijacked it.
  8. 27 Apr '10 14:42
    Originally posted by MrPhil
    'It's crackers to slip a rozzer the dropsy in snide' is good advice
    Ah. I only got as far as the MAD quote. Apparently they had a lot of letters asking for more on this phrase, and the above was their printed reply.

    Phil.
  9. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    08 May '10 18:14 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by avalanchethecat
    But a little more research reveals that:

    Magersfontein Lugg is a fictional character in the Albert Campion novels, written by Margery Allingham (1904-1966). Lugg, in The Fashion in Shrouds (originally published in 1938), is the originator of the curious sentence, "It's crackers to slip a rozzer the dropsy in snide". Mad Magazine just hijacked it.
    Well said!

    Here is another: Where did this come from?:

    "There's an alligator on the zipper"
  10. Subscriber Suzianne
    Misfit Queen
    19 May '10 23:48 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Well said!

    Here is another: Where did this come from?:

    "There's an alligator on the zipper"
    alligator=a piece of rubber from a tire you often see on roadways (often a piece of tread looking like an alligator's back)

    zipper=the white dashed line down the middle of some roads

    CB slang
  11. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    21 May '10 18:45 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    alligator=a piece of rubber from a tire you often see on roadways (often a piece of tread looking like an alligator's back)

    zipper=the white dashed line down the middle of some roads

    CB slang
    Very good! I heard that one time actually on a CB, I had a kind of 500 mile commute a few years ago to Toledo, Ohio and that's where I came across that saying. It would be interesting to find out who invented it.

    There was actually a movie by the same name!

    http://www.alligatoronthezipper.com/