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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    03 Mar '08 15:59 / 1 edit
    "Who Owns the Zebra?"


    A PROBLEM IN INFERENTIAL REASONING


    There are five houses:

    1. The Englishman lives in the red house.

    2. The Spaniard owns a dog.

    3. Coffee is served in the green house.

    4. The Ukrainian drinks tea.

    5. The green house is just to the right of the ivory house.

    6. The man who smokes Old Golds owns snails.

    7. Kools are smoked in the yellow house.

    8. The man in the middle house drinks milk.

    9. The Norwegian lives in the first house.

    10. The Chesterfield smoker lives next to the man with a fox.

    11. The man who smokes Kools lives next to the man who owns a horse.

    12. The Lucky Strike smoker drinks orange juice.

    13. The Japanese smokes Parliaments.

    14. The Norwegian lives next to the blue house.


    Note: Each man has one house, one pet, one brand of smokes, one drink
    and is of a different nationality.



    QUESTION: Who drinks water and who owns the zebra?



    -gb

    3/3/08
  2. 03 Mar '08 16:40
    I reckon
    The Norwegian man drinks Water and
    The Japenese Man owns the Zebra.

    Do I get a Gold Star?
  3. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    03 Mar '08 17:24
    Originally posted by scarbelly
    I reckon
    The Norwegian man drinks Water and
    The Japenese Man owns the Zebra.

    Do I get a Gold Star?
    Thought maybe I'd let it run a month or more and then confirm
    the solution. Would be interested in your rationale. -gb
  4. 03 Mar '08 17:58
    Oh! Oh! it's something like this taking the Houses from left to right I figure the following

    Colour
    Yellow : Blue : Red : Ivory : Green :

    Nationality
    Norwegian : Ukrainian : English : Spanish : Japanese :

    Drink
    WATER : Tea : Milk : Orange Juice : Coffee :

    Smokes
    Kools : Chesterfield : Old Gold : Lucky Strike : Parliaments :

    Pet
    Fox : Horse : Snails : Dog : ZEBRA :

    I think that it satisfies all the criteria (but I haven't double checked) unless I've missed something in which case it's back to the drawing board and a "Could Do Better".
    Sorry if I've ruined the potential to let it run but I enjoy things like that and so often. That said I bet if they held a Street Party it would be interesting
  5. 04 Mar '08 08:11
    Version 3 or 4 of Einstein's riddle posted in this forum. I believe one of the threads even discussed 'how' best to solve this kind of riddle, but I don't find it. It still remains a classic, though.
  6. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's about respect
    04 Mar '08 15:03 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    "Who Owns the Zebra?"


    A PROBLEM IN INFERENTIAL REASONING


    There are five houses:

    1. The Englishman lives in the red house.

    2. The Spaniard owns a dog.

    3. Coffee is served in the green house.

    4. The Ukrainian drinks tea.

    5. The green house is just to the right of the ivory house.

    6. The man who smokes Old Gold ...[text shortened]... tionality.



    QUESTION: Who drinks water and who owns the zebra?



    -gb

    3/3/08
    Maybe none of them own a zebra. That's the classic Einsteinian answer.
  7. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    04 Mar '08 16:41 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    Version 3 or 4 of Einstein's riddle posted in this forum. I believe one of the threads even discussed 'how' best to solve this kind of riddle, but I don't find it. It still remains a classic, though.
    The anatomy of this particular challenge seems to lend itself to far simpler solution than a chess game (familiarity/unfamiliarity factors

    aside)... only 14 'squares' to view as opposed to 64. Clearly, there are three escalating categories of information: #1. Definitive base facts

    (1, 2, 4, 9, 13). #2, Derivative facts which initiate the process of elimination (3, 6, 7, 8, 12). #3. The final/higher order of clues which,

    in effect, present the entire challenge of the problem (5, 10, 11, 14). Only with management of these does the reasoning become fluid.

    So it would seem from my categorical point of view. -Bobby