1. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    11 Aug '14 17:00
    http://phys.org/news/2014-08-japanese-universities-world-fastest-camera.html

    Now THAT"S fast!
  2. Cape Town
    Joined
    14 Apr '05
    Moves
    52945
    12 Aug '14 07:16
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2014-08-japanese-universities-world-fastest-camera.html

    Now THAT"S fast!
    You could fill up your 1Tb hard disk with <1 second worth of of movie. 🙂
    Of course in practice, your computer couldn't actually save the data to disk at that rate. I wonder how they manage to move the data from the camera to storage.
  3. Joined
    11 Nov '05
    Moves
    43938
    12 Aug '14 08:451 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2014-08-japanese-universities-world-fastest-camera.html

    Now THAT"S fast!
    How many pixels/frame? Full colour or B/W only? Is that known?

    Edit: pixel resolution = (450 × 450) Not even VGA resolution.
  4. Cape Town
    Joined
    14 Apr '05
    Moves
    52945
    12 Aug '14 10:48
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    How many pixels/frame? Full colour or B/W only? Is that known?

    Edit: pixel resolution = (450 × 450) Not even VGA resolution.
    That's still 200,000 bytes needing to be moved off the camera every 4.4 trillionths of a second.
    Assuming American trillions that's a data rate of 50,000,000 GB/s. ( 50 Petabytes per second).
    I don't think any data-bus or storage system can handle that.
    Even if you include compression on-chip, I don't think its feasible.

    According to Wikipedia:
    AT&T transfers about 30 petabytes of data through its networks each day.

    Supercomputers: In January 2012, Cray began construction of the Blue Waters Supercomputer, which will have a capacity of 500 petabytes making it the largest storage array ever if realized.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petabyte
  5. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    12 Aug '14 11:45
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    That's still 200,000 bytes needing to be moved off the camera every 4.4 trillionths of a second.
    Assuming American trillions that's a data rate of 50,000,000 GB/s. ( 50 Petabytes per second).
    I don't think any data-bus or storage system can handle that.
    Even if you include compression on-chip, I don't think its feasible.

    According to Wikipedia:
    [qu ...[text shortened]... t the largest storage array ever if realized.
    [/quote]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petabyte
    Was that 500 Pb in ram or hard drive/ssd? That is a LOT of memory in any case!

    My guess is that camera feeds a bunch of drives or ram in parallel, don't see how they could do it serially.
  6. Cape Town
    Joined
    14 Apr '05
    Moves
    52945
    12 Aug '14 15:31
    I think the solution is that it only takes a short burst of 6 pictures at a time.
  7. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    12 Aug '14 21:05
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I think the solution is that it only takes a short burst of 6 pictures at a time.
    Was that in the article? 6 frames?
  8. Cape Town
    Joined
    14 Apr '05
    Moves
    52945
    13 Aug '14 05:58
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Was that in the article? 6 frames?
    The article you referenced is a report on this article:
    http://www.nature.com/nphoton/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nphoton.2014.163.html
    which has pictures showing 6 frames.

    If I understand it correctly, a sequence of pulses in different wavelengths is fired at the target. The result is then separated out based on wavelength to create the images.
  9. Joined
    11 Nov '05
    Moves
    43938
    14 Aug '14 06:58
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    The article you referenced is a report on this article:
    http://www.nature.com/nphoton/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nphoton.2014.163.html
    which has pictures showing 6 frames.

    If I understand it correctly, a sequence of pulses in different wavelengths is fired at the target. The result is then separated out based on wavelength to create the images.
    So only one (!) picture is taken during a time period hugely exceeding a 4.4 trillionth of a second. During this time six flashes with different wavelengths has flashed, one at a time, with a offset of 4.4 trillionth of a second each. And then the one only picture, 450x450 pixels, is stored in memory for later analyse and wavelength separation.

    The result is six black and white pictures a 4.4 trillionth of a second apart.

    This method cannot be used to examine exactly when a politician changes his opinion, because that is too fast phenomenon to be analysed...
Back to Top