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  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    24 Oct '14 14:34
    http://phys.org/news/2014-10-mycologist-agarikon-possibility-counter-antibiotic.html

    This fungus was even known to the ancient Greeks for its medicinal value.
  2. 24 Oct '14 15:59 / 5 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2014-10-mycologist-agarikon-possibility-counter-antibiotic.html

    This fungus was even known to the ancient Greeks for its medicinal value.
    the link mentions:

    "...Stamets has been working with the University of Illinois to more closely study the medicinal benefits of the fungi, starting shortly after 9/11. He and the team there found that administration of agarikon showed anti-tubular activity when testing against the tuberculosis bacteria, reaffirming ancient beliefs. They also reaffirmed that eating the fungi can reduce inflammation and that it can be used to help combat both bacterial and viral infections.
    ..."

    Are they implying here by "help combat" that this fungus works against BOTH bacteria and viruses!? If so, now I think that could a rarity! Bear in mind that virtually all known antibiotics, including all that have come from fungi, are totally useless against viruses.
    Did they test it on rats? people? or only cell cultures in the laboratory? I hope this fungus works but I would like to know how scientifically reliable this claim is as I fear it sounds just a little bit too good to be true.
  3. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    24 Oct '14 17:05
    Originally posted by humy
    the link mentions:

    "...Stamets has been working with the University of Illinois to more closely study the medicinal benefits of the fungi, starting shortly after 9/11. He and the team there found that administration of agarikon showed anti-tubular activity when testing against the tuberculosis bacteria, reaffirming ancient beliefs. They also reaffirmed that ...[text shortened]... scientifically reliable this claim is as I fear it sounds just a little bit too good to be true.
    Plausibly it could contain an enzyme which interferes with reverse transcriptase. The diseases mentioned are various influenza bugs which are RNA viruses, and herpes and cowpox which are DNA viruses. It could also be that it just has an anti-inflamatory action which helps with the illness without acting against the virus directly. I don't see any reason why a fungus should not develop anti-viral defences, the only surprise is the benefits could be passed on to what is from the fungus' point of view a predator. I wonder if it's any good against Ebola?
  4. 24 Oct '14 17:22
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2014-10-mycologist-agarikon-possibility-counter-antibiotic.html

    This fungus was even known to the ancient Greeks for its medicinal value.
    It is an exciting find for sure.


    Agarikon contains antiviral molecules new to science. Researchers for pharmaceutical companies may have missed its potent antiviral properties. Our analyses show that the mycelial cultures of this mushroom are most active but that the fruitbodies, the natural form of the mushroom, are not. The fact that Agarikon is active against both viruses and bacteria suggests that it can provide a natural bioshield against potential infection and disease transmission. As the medical values of Agarikon continue to be researched, the value of biodiversity -- or mycodiversity -- of this species can truly be appreciated.


    http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/1861947