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Science Forum

  1. Subscriber vandervelde
    medieval punk rocker
    08 Feb '18 06:46
    Well, reading again about "Black hole information paradox", I would like to ask:
    - Is information really material?
    From philosophical view, information should be a convention, something in men's mind.
    All right I think the same about time, but it (time) still bends, shrinks etc, according to Einstein.

    Again, let us contemplate about information.
    Information is something we grasp like it.
    And then "physical information always leads to increasing of the surface except in black hole..."

    All right, what's the difference between physical information and "ordinary information" (if there is any), and how information can put amount of physicalness to anything?!
  2. 08 Feb '18 15:50 / 3 edits
    can any real physicists here tell me, in their personal opinion, if, when physicists talk about "physical infomation" in this context, do they really know what they are talking about or is it all just a load of confused meta-physical nonsense? Or does that just depend on exactly what kind of "information" they are talking about?
    I have often wondered.

    I tried looking it up here;
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_information
    but it seems to have several possible conflicting meanings given there and I find it a very tedious read that I somehow find leaves me unenlightened.
  3. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    10 Feb '18 01:11
    The problem is that physicists tend to mean one of two things when they talk about information. One is entropy (c.f. Shannon entropy), the other is the density of states operator, the two quantities are related. The one relevant to the black hole information paradox is the density of states operator.

    I'd have to do a little revision before writing anything more about this. But one objection I have to this is that, from the point of view of an asymptotic observer, an object falling into a black hole takes an infinite amount of time to get to the event horizon. This means that as far as the asymptotic observer is concerned no information is ever actually lost.