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  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    31 Oct '16 12:31
    http://phys.org/news/2016-02-hubble-image-giant.html#nRlv

    Or in stupid units, 81 billion miles. Like 20 times bigger than our solar system. That is some freaky gravity well! I wonder if you had a spacecraft enter that BH, would the tidal forces be less there where you could survive a trip down that rabbit hole?
  2. Standard member pawnpawonline
    Please Pay Attention
    10 Nov '16 17:03
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2016-02-hubble-image-giant.html#nRlv

    Or in stupid units, 81 billion miles. Like 20 times bigger than our solar system. That is some freaky gravity well! I wonder if you had a spacecraft enter that BH, would the tidal forces be less there where you could survive a trip down that rabbit hole?
    If you can withstand the pressure, you're ok.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    10 Nov '16 18:56
    Originally posted by pawnpaw
    If you can withstand the pressure, you're ok.
    It's not pressure, it stretches you apart, you go from 2 meters to 200 meters.....
  4. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    11 Nov '16 18:42
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2016-02-hubble-image-giant.html#nRlv

    Or in stupid units, 81 billion miles. Like 20 times bigger than our solar system. That is some freaky gravity well! I wonder if you had a spacecraft enter that BH, would the tidal forces be less there where you could survive a trip down that rabbit hole?
    Near the event horizon of super-massive black holes the tidal forces are relatively weak. Nearer the event horizon they become significant. For stellar mass black holes this isn't the case, tidal forces are large near the event horizon.
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    15 Nov '16 19:27
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    Near the event horizon of super-massive black holes the tidal forces are relatively weak. Nearer the event horizon they become significant. For stellar mass black holes this isn't the case, tidal forces are large near the event horizon.
    If the 130 E 9 km number is right, the mass is on the order of 8 E 40 kg +! Sol is about 2 E30 kg so that dude is billions of times the mass of the sun.
  6. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    16 Nov '16 07:31
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    Near the event horizon of super-massive black holes the tidal forces are relatively weak. Nearer the event horizon they become significant. For stellar mass black holes this isn't the case, tidal forces are large near the event horizon.
    The second sentence should read: "Nearer the singularity they [tidal forces] become significant."
  7. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    16 Nov '16 11:21
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    The second sentence should read: "Nearer the singularity they [tidal forces] become significant."
    At this point we don't know there is a singularity, that is to say, some infinite density. It probably is no such thing, our physics is just not good enough to suss it out yet. We may find you jump into that giant BH and pop out in another universe.