1. Standard memberThequ1ck
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    16 May '11 05:47
    Some exciting news in the UK rags about medical advances in AIDS and Cancer by using modified strains of Herpes.

    'The virus gets into the cancer cells and once inside, replicates until the cells burst.'
    Read more: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/6646151.stm

    'Cytomegalovirus, which belongs to the herpes family, enables the immune system to be constantly on the alert for HIV.
    Read more: http://www.metro.co.uk/news/863046-herpes-virus-in-a-vaccine-may-win-the-fight-against-hiv#ixzz1MUXNq4zQ'
  2. Subscribersonhouse
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    27 May '11 17:16
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    Some exciting news in the UK rags about medical advances in AIDS and Cancer by using modified strains of Herpes.

    'The virus gets into the cancer cells and once inside, replicates until the cells burst.'
    Read more: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/6646151.stm

    'Cytomegalovirus, which belongs to the herpes family, enables the immune system to be consta ...[text shortened]... tro.co.uk/news/863046-herpes-virus-in-a-vaccine-may-win-the-fight-against-hiv#ixzz1MUXNq4zQ'
    That's not the only front on AIDS, look at this link also:

    http://www.thebody.com/content/art53624.html?ap=825
  3. Standard memberThequ1ck
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    29 May '11 06:46
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    That's not the only front on AIDS, look at this link also:

    http://www.thebody.com/content/art53624.html?ap=825
    Yes, I read this a while back and I'm not convinced.
    Firstly it's a one off. The guy had leukaemia which excludes him as a control.
    Secondly it sounds very expensive.
    Thirdly he got a match for his blood type but that was luck too? What about
    people with rare blood types?
    and Finally there's nothing to say he can't catch it again.

    No, I like the 'send a thief to catch a thief' philosophy. The Herpes virus stays
    put as a resident body-guard against the virus for life. It's easy to administer.
    Is very cost effective. And let's face it, is the right direction for future
    medicine. Not of this barbaric cut, stitch, glop mentality.
  4. Subscribersonhouse
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    29 May '11 19:22
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    Yes, I read this a while back and I'm not convinced.
    Firstly it's a one off. The guy had leukaemia which excludes him as a control.
    Secondly it sounds very expensive.
    Thirdly he got a match for his blood type but that was luck too? What about
    people with rare blood types?
    and Finally there's nothing to say he can't catch it again.

    No, I like ...[text shortened]... right direction for future
    medicine. Not of this barbaric cut, stitch, glop mentality.
    Well it pays to go after these things from several angles. Don't forget, AIDS has been unstoppable for a quarter century and anything that gives hope has merit. I think you are wrong on one thing, the stem cell method gives lifetime immunity because it bestows the natural immunity inherent in one or two percent of Europeans. It may be expensive now but would come down in price if it were the preferred method. It also helps to have two avenues of approach because some people may have problems with either cure.
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