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  1. 18 Apr '18 18:41 / 1 edit
    https://phys.org/news/2017-07-china-artificial-sun-world-steady-state.html

    "China's 'artificial sun' sets world record with 100 second steady-state high performance plasma"

    "China's Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) made
    an important advance by achieving a stable 101.2-second steady-state
    high confinement plasma, setting a world record in long-pulse H-mode
    operation on the night of July 3rd [2017]."

    A Chinese scientist has said that, if the projected rate of progress continues,
    China could have an operating nuclear fusion plant in 50-60 years.

    If so, this advance could largely free China from dependence on fossil fuels.
    Given that the disputes over territorial claims in the South China Sea seem
    motivated by, in addition to nationalism, the hope that it has vast oil reserves,
    future technology could ease a way toward peaceful reconciliation.
    To explain it another way, if oil becomes less important in a world with nuclear fusion
    energy technology, then countries may become less motivated to go to war over oil.

    Should other governments wish that China's nuclear fusion project succeeds or fails?
  2. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    19 Apr '18 15:33 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    https://phys.org/news/2017-07-china-artificial-sun-world-steady-state.html

    "China's 'artificial sun' sets world record with 100 second steady-state high performance plasma"

    "China's Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) made
    an important advance by achieving a stable 101.2-second steady-state
    high confinement plasma, setting a worl ...[text shortened]... ver oil.

    Should other governments wish that China's nuclear fusion project succeeds or fails?
    ITER has gone through a number of engineering advances and will be ready for full power in a couple of decades. As you of course know, ITER is already an international project. There are others like the ST40 reactor in the UK, just proven to also make an extreme temperature plasma.

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/lockheed-claims-breakthrough-on-fusion-energy1/

    This is a fusion reactor that will fit on a large truck and it is getting a nice plasma. This piece seems like a puff piece, no mention of the technology involved, just saying it's a breakthrough, presumably ONLY because of the small size.

    One key use of small reactors like this would be in spaceflight, couple a gigawatt or so to a VASIMIR plasma rocket and the solar system will be our back yard. VASIMIR rockets have the potential to get us to mars in a month, 8 times faster than chemical rockets of today, important for the safety of the crew since one solar flare can kill the whole crew if they fly through one. That one month to 40 day journey is based on a constant acceleration of 1/20th of a g, maybe 1/10th of a g, which would hardly be felt by the crew, not enough to stop bone deterioration but a significant improvement on travel times.
    Because of constant acceleration, going to Saturn, 1.6 billion Km away roughly, times there would be not a whole lot longer than going to Mars. Fusion reactors are the key to travel around the solar system.

    The reactor in China will be welcomed in the science world, and if they get it going for real and on an industrial scale it will greatly reduce greenhouse gasses from China which is one of the largest producers of such gasses along with the US and India of course.

    Lockheed says their reactor will be online producing power within a decade. Of course that has to be proven.

    Here is a ted talk by a teenager named Taylor Wilson who built a home made fusion reactor in his basement at age 14. I'd say he is Mensa material

    https://www.ted.com/talks/taylor_wilson_yup_i_built_a_nuclear_fusion_reactor
  3. 19 Apr '18 20:12 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    ITER has gone through a number of engineering advances and will be ready for full power in a couple of decades. As you of course know, ITER is already an international project. There are others like the ST40 reactor in the UK, just proven to also make an extreme temperature plasma.

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/lockheed-claims-breakthrough ...[text shortened]... Mensa material

    https://www.ted.com/talks/taylor_wilson_yup_i_built_a_nuclear_fusion_reactor
    "The reactor in China will be welcomed in the science world ..."
    --Sonhouse

    Would a successful Chinese fusion plant be welcomed in the US political world? I doubt it.
    And if it happens, the racist US media will prefer to deny it or accuse the Chinese (who allegedly
    are incapable of developing any original technology) of 'stealing' the secrets from the West.
  4. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    21 Apr '18 18:10
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    "The reactor in China will be welcomed in the science world ..."
    --Sonhouse

    Would a successful Chinese fusion plant be welcomed in the US political world? I doubt it.
    And if it happens, the racist US media will prefer to deny it or accuse the Chinese (who allegedly
    are incapable of developing any original technology) of 'stealing' the secrets from the West.
    Scientists will welcome their input even if the hypocritical politicians won't.
  5. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    22 Apr '18 17:50
    As I understand it, the difficulty with nuclear fusion is not getting tritium and deuterium to fuse, just search for "fusor" on YouTube and you can see people doing it in their own garages. Getting a longer burn than anyone else is nice PR but doesn't really advance the field. The problem is that the immense neutron flux from the reaction degrades the tokamak casing, and so there is a materials problem. It would be interesting if they've made progress with that.
  6. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    22 Apr '18 18:29
    Originally posted by @deepthought
    As I understand it, the difficulty with nuclear fusion is not getting tritium and deuterium to fuse, just search for "fusor" on YouTube and you can see people doing it in their own garages. Getting a longer burn than anyone else is nice PR but doesn't really advance the field. The problem is that the immense neutron flux from the reaction degrades the ...[text shortened]... nd so there is a materials problem. It would be interesting if they've made progress with that.
    No, the problem is energy in V energy out, right now no reactor has even broken even much less getting 50 times the energy it took to initiate fusion which is where it gets commercial.
    Neutron flux is only one problem, another is turbulence in the plasma which is being researched very intensely.
  7. 22 Apr '18 20:49
    Originally posted by @deepthought
    As I understand it, the difficulty with nuclear fusion is not getting tritium and deuterium to fuse, just search for "fusor" on YouTube and you can see people doing it in their own garages. Getting a longer burn than anyone else is nice PR but doesn't really advance the field. The problem is that the immense neutron flux from the reaction degrades the ...[text shortened]... nd so there is a materials problem. It would be interesting if they've made progress with that.
    "Getting a longer burn than anyone else is nice PR but doesn't really advance the field."
    --DeepThought

    Chinese scientists say that they expect to keep 'getting longer burns' gradually.
    Is there a foreseeable physical barrier that would stop them from achieving that progress?

    By the way, the BBC recently (belatedly) noticed this story and ran a report about it.
    A BBC television journalist and crew were invited to visit the Chinese fusion reactor.
  8. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    22 Apr '18 23:38
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    "Getting a longer burn than anyone else is nice PR but doesn't really advance the field."
    --DeepThought

    Chinese scientists say that they expect to keep 'getting longer burns' gradually.
    Is there a foreseeable physical barrier that would stop them from achieving that progress?

    By the way, the BBC recently (belatedly) noticed this story and ran a r ...[text shortened]... bout it.
    A BBC television journalist and crew were invited to visit the Chinese fusion reactor.
    Journalists can spread the story about the Chinese effort but are obviously not in a position to judge the actual performance of the machine.

    Fusion is such a tough challenge it takes the talents of the entire planet to solve this one.
  9. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    26 Apr '18 03:17
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    No, the problem is energy in V energy out, right now no reactor has even broken even much less getting 50 times the energy it took to initiate fusion which is where it gets commercial.
    Take a set of Particles A and quantumly entangle them with a set of Particles B.
    Take Particle B particles to a separate reactor.
    Initiate fusion of Particles A.
    Particles B will automatically initiate fusion with no additional energy required.

    Ramp up on larger scale for commericial operations.

    *Patent pending
  10. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    28 Apr '18 00:16
    Originally posted by @uzless
    Take a set of Particles A and quantumly entangle them with a set of Particles B.
    Take Particle B particles to a separate reactor.
    Initiate fusion of Particles A.
    Particles B will automatically initiate fusion with no additional energy required.

    Ramp up on larger scale for commericial operations.

    *Patent pending
    Good luck with that one. Maybe you will be the next billionaire.
  11. 28 Apr '18 03:01
    Originally posted by @uzless
    Take a set of Particles A and quantumly entangle them with a set of Particles B.
    Take Particle B particles to a separate reactor.
    Initiate fusion of Particles A.
    Particles B will automatically initiate fusion with no additional energy required.

    Ramp up on larger scale for commericial operations.

    *Patent pending
    I don't think quantum entanglement works that way.
  12. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 Apr '18 19:41 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @metal-brain
    I don't think quantum entanglement works that way.
    One pesky problem with that theory: Entanglement is usually done at near 0 degrees Kelvin (absolute zero) and just in the last month or so, observing entanglement at room temps.

    It is a rather large step going from even 300 K to 100 MILLION K and expecting to get entangled particles at that temp.

    It's just a poop dream.