1. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
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    01 Jan '18 16:431 edit
    https://phys.org/news/2018-01-metalens-focuses-rainbow-possibilities-virtual.html
    Sorry, misspelled spectrum.
    Right now they are small and working to get one up to a centimeter in diameter.

    I would love to see these things a METER in diameter! Or 2! That won't be for a few years but it is an exciting development nonetheless.
  2. Joined
    06 Mar '12
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    625
    01 Jan '18 17:302 edits
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    https://phys.org/news/2018-01-metalens-focuses-rainbow-possibilities-virtual.html
    Sorry, misspelled spectrum.
    Right now they are small and working to get one up to a centimeter in diameter.

    I would love to see these things a METER in diameter! Or 2! That won't be for a few years but it is an exciting development nonetheless.
    If that research proves to be sound, that WILL revolutionize optics!
    I have (informally and just for personal interest) studied chromatic aberration and know that it is normally a huge obstacle in designing cheap flat thin non-bulky lenses.
    I don't understand how "paired nanofins control the refractive index on the metasurface" can work specifically to make all the wavelengths travel at the same speed thus bend (refract) by the same amount as required but (obviously) I take their word for it that it works.
  3. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
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    52619
    02 Jan '18 13:25
    Originally posted by @humy
    If that research proves to be sound, that WILL revolutionize optics!
    I have (informally and just for personal interest) studied chromatic aberration and know that it is normally a huge obstacle in designing cheap flat thin non-bulky lenses.
    I don't understand how "paired nanofins control the refractive index on the metasurface" can work specifically to make ...[text shortened]... (refract) by the same amount as required but (obviously) I take their word for it that it works.
    My question would be, say you pump 100 milliwatts of light with visable spectrum, and you have a power meter at focus, do you still have 100 milliwatts? My guess is not all the light gets focused because it looks like various sized 'nanofins' would be used to have a multispectrum focus so it looks like those nanofins cannot do it to every photon that passes through the lens. That's what it looks like to me, and of course I can be 100% wrong.