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  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    17 Apr '18 16:47 / 1 edit
    https://www.cnn.com/2018/04/16/asia/japan-rare-earth-metals-find-china-economy-trnd/index.html

    Japan finds major source of rare earth elements, will throw monkey wrench into China's monopoly. Will be game changer, a really big deal.

    The US has reopened rare earth mines but are way behind in any production but this Japanese island will change everything for the better, my guess is rare earths will be half price when Japan gets production pumped up.

    It is said we will have literally hundreds of years of rare earths from that one find.
  2. 18 Apr '18 18:57
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    https://www.cnn.com/2018/04/16/asia/japan-rare-earth-metals-find-china-economy-trnd/index.html

    Japan finds major source of rare earth elements, will throw monkey wrench into China's monopoly. Will be game changer, a really big deal.

    The US has reopened rare earth mines but are way behind in any production but this Japanese island will change everyth ...[text shortened]... d up.

    It is said we will have literally hundreds of years of rare earths from that one find.
    One should not assume (amidst ignorant Sinophobia) that China always has had a 'monopoly' in rare earths.
    In the early 1980s, China had hardly any presence in the rare earths industry.
    China's government (advised by its scientists) perceived a great opportunity and then
    pursued policies toward its fulfillment.

    As I recall, Deng Xiaoping wrote an article about China's development in which he made
    the point of mentioning rare earths and asserting that the government's policies would
    make it possible for China to become a major player in the rare earth industry.
    At that time, some Westerners responded with the usual racist sneering, presuming that
    Deng Xiaoping must be delusional and what he wrote could never happen in reality.
    (It's hard to imagine any Western leader taking a personal interest in rare earths.)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rare_earth_industry_in_China

    "In 1980, the Chinese Society of Rare Earths was created and just five years later,
    they established the China Rare Earth Information Center (CREIC)."

    "It is estimated the world has 99 million tonnes of rare earth reserve deposits.[6] China's reserves
    are estimated to be 36 million tonnes or roughly 30 percent of the world's total reserves."
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    19 Apr '18 16:21
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    One should not assume (amidst ignorant Sinophobia) that China always has had a 'monopoly' in rare earths.
    In the early 1980s, China had hardly any presence in the rare earths industry.
    China's government (advised by its scientists) perceived a great opportunity and then
    pursued policies toward its fulfillment.

    As I recall, Deng Xiaoping wrote an art ...[text shortened]... es
    are estimated to be 36 million tonnes or roughly 30 percent of the world's total reserves."
    The Chinese definitely has a monopoly right now, not so in the past and now probably not so in the future, that was just a comment on the reality of the situation, not saying anything about the politics of the issue.
  4. 19 Apr '18 20:15 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    The Chinese definitely has a monopoly right now, not so in the past and now probably not so in the future,
    that was just a comment on the reality of the situation, not saying anything about the politics of the issue.
    During the Second World War, the USA had a huge advantage because it could produce
    well over half (perhaps about 2/3, though I don't recall the figures) of the world's oil.
    Unlike the Axis, the USA did not have to worry much about fuel shortages.
    How times have changed.
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    20 Apr '18 21:33
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    During the Second World War, the USA had a huge advantage because it could produce
    well over half (perhaps about 2/3, though I don't recall the figures) of the world's oil.
    Unlike the Axis, the USA did not have to worry much about fuel shortages.
    How times have changed.
    Not sure what your comment has to do with the price of rare earths.
  6. 20 Apr '18 21:51 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    Not sure what your comment has to do with the price of rare earths.
    "...not so in the past and now probably not so in the future."
    --Sonhouse

    The USA was once the world's largest--by far--producer of oil.
    'How times have changed', as I wrote.

    I doubt that China's government will plan its economy upon the projection that China
    always will have a monopoly on rare earths.
  7. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    20 Apr '18 23:19
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    "...not so in the past and now probably not so in the future."
    --Sonhouse

    The USA was once the world's largest--by far--producer of oil.
    'How times have changed', as I wrote.

    I doubt that China's government will plan its economy upon the projection that China
    always will have a monopoly on rare earths.
    Well of course, since rare earths are a minor part of their total economy. It's just one business.