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  1. 05 Jul '18 20:56 / 1 edit
    https://www.quantamagazine.org/axolotl-genome-slowly-yields-secrets-of-limb-regrowth-20180702/

    "Salamander’s Genome Guards Secrets of Limb Regrowth"

    "The axolotl, a species of permanently aquatic salamander, has an ability
    to regenerate lost body parts that is unrivaled among vertebrates.
    Researchers are using what they learn from axolotls to probe the
    potential for regrowth after injuries in other animals."

    "Ironically, for animals that can survive so many horrible injuries, axolotls
    haven’t been able to withstand these combined assaults and are now
    nearly extinct in the wild. But the laboratory population has thrived."

    "The axolotl is only native to Lake Xochimilco and Lake Chalco in central Mexico.
    Lake Chalco no longer exists, as it was artificially drained to avoid periodic flooding,
    and Lake Xochimilco remains a remnant of its former self, existing mainly as canals."
    --Wikipedia

    "A four-month-long search in 2013, however, turned up no surviving individuals in the wild.
    Just a month later, two wild ones were spotted in a network of canals leading from Xochimilco."
    --Wikipedia
  2. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    06 Jul '18 11:18
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    https://www.quantamagazine.org/axolotl-genome-slowly-yields-secrets-of-limb-regrowth-20180702/

    "Salamander’s Genome Guards Secrets of Limb Regrowth"

    "The axolotl, a species of permanently aquatic salamander, has an ability
    to regenerate lost body parts that is unrivaled among vertebrates.
    Researchers are using what they learn from axolotls to pr ...[text shortened]... later, two wild ones were spotted in a network of canals leading from Xochimilco."
    --Wikipedia
    That would be a real boon for amputees if they can figure out how to introduce the genes responsible for regrowth. So at least lab specimens are still alive so future genetic research won't be lost as well.
  3. 11 Jul '18 02:50
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    That would be a real boon for amputees if they can figure out how to introduce the genes responsible for regrowth. So at least lab specimens are still alive so future genetic research won't be lost as well.
    From memory, I think this is a matter of anatomy rather than genetics. The way bones form in conjunction with nerves and vessels does not lend itself well to faithful and reproducible regeneration of limbs. Other mammalian parts do regenerate: skin, blood, hair, muscle.

    Axolotl's are pretty cool (and incredibly rare) though. But we can't just introduce their genes and ... voila... new limbs.
  4. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    11 Jul '18 05:29
    Originally posted by @wildgrass
    From memory, I think this is a matter of anatomy rather than genetics. The way bones form in conjunction with nerves and vessels does not lend itself well to faithful and reproducible regeneration of limbs. Other mammalian parts do regenerate: skin, blood, hair, muscle.

    Axolotl's are pretty cool (and incredibly rare) though. But we can't just introduce their genes and ... voila... new limbs.
    I had a look at the Wikipedia page, the section on regeneration does not talk about why it does not work in mammals. However, it does mention that they heal without scarring, a property of human embryos, and that if injected with thyroid hormones to induce metamorphosis, their ability to regenerate is greatly reduced. So it seems to be to do with not fully leaving the larval stage. Humans do heal like this (although probably not to the extent of regrowing limbs) but only as embryos and we do not have a huge amount of choice about leaving that stage...
  5. Standard member apathist
    looking for loot
    11 Jul '18 13:05
    stem cells
  6. 11 Jul '18 18:36 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @deepthought to Wildgrass
    I had a look at the Wikipedia page, the section on regeneration does not talk about why it does not work in mammals. However, it does mention that they heal without scarring, a property of human embryos, and that if injected with thyroid hormones to induce metamorphosis, their ability to regenerate is greatly reduced. So it seems to be to ...[text shortened]... imbs) but only as embryos and we do not have a huge amount of choice about leaving that stage...
    "I had a look at the Wikipedia page, the section on regeneration..."
    --DeepThought

    Now will the lying troll Wolfe63 start trolling DeepThought too?

    "Why waste time reading Duchess64's Wikipedia links, citations and copy & pastes?
    She presents a lazy tactic void of creative intellect."
    --Wolfe63 (10 July 2018, "Science, Capitalism, Fraud, and Gullibility" )
  7. 11 Jul '18 18:51
    Originally posted by @deepthought
    I had a look at the Wikipedia page, the section on regeneration does not talk about why it does not work in mammals. However, it does mention that they heal without scarring, a property of human embryos, and that if injected with thyroid hormones to induce metamorphosis, their ability to regenerate is greatly reduced. So it seems to be to do with not ...[text shortened]... imbs) but only as embryos and we do not have a huge amount of choice about leaving that stage...
    Indeed, among tissues that do regenerate in mammals, e.g. skin and blood, there is evidence that developmental programs are being partially reactivated. The microenvironmental context is of course very different, however. The braking mechanisms in adult regeneration are very important (to avoid neoplasms).