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Science Forum

  1. 27 May '17 15:59
    Rather than debating temperature rises and the cherry picking of data from different sources it may be better to gauge glacier melting with sea level rise since that is where the melting ends up.

    Nils-Axel Mörner says sea levels are not increasing at an alarming rate. Is he wrong and if so by how much?
  2. 27 May '17 17:05
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_level_rise
  3. 27 May '17 17:47 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    Nils-Axel Mörner says sea levels are not increasing at an alarming rate. Is he wrong and if so by how much?
    He is wrong by 0.03 'alarmings'. Or is that within his margin of error?
  4. 27 May '17 17:52
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    Rather than debating temperature rises and the cherry picking of data from different sources it may be better to gauge glacier melting with sea level rise since that is where the melting ends up.

    Nils-Axel Mörner says sea levels are not increasing at an alarming rate. Is he wrong and if so by how much?
    How alarming sea level rise is, depends very much on where you live. Although I live near the sea in Cape Town, I am not yet alarmed personally. I am certainly concerned about the long term though.

    But sea level rise is only one aspect of global warming. An glacier melt rates is probably not the smartest way to measure temperatures. We have thermometers, and satellites for that.
  5. 27 May '17 18:02 / 7 edits
    Originally posted by Metal Brain

    Nils-Axel Mörner says sea levels are not increasing at an alarming rate. Is he wrong and if so by how much?
    1, I am not aware of anyone, let alone a climate scientist, saying that sea level rise is currently occurring at an 'alarming rate". I am not implying such a person doesn't exists but rather such people must be a relative rarity and certainly not what we would call 'the norm'.

    2, your question is a totally stupid one to post in a SCIENCE forum since "alarming" (anything) isn't a scientific term or scientific quantity but rather is an emotional response. So your question "Is he wrong and if so by how much?" is a totally unanswerable question in any valid science; unless you can explain to us how we can numerically (i.e. put an actual number to it such as "3" or 5.3" etc ) and scientifically define the 'amount of' emotion of "alarm" so we can then say, as you asked, "...by how much"
  6. 27 May '17 18:17
    Nils-Axel Mörner - not always correct...

    http://www.vof.se/folkvett/ar-1997/nr-3-4/klockan-som-slagruta/
  7. 27 May '17 18:18
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    How alarming sea level rise is, depends very much on where you live. .
    and also on your personality.
  8. 27 May '17 18:23 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Nils-Axel Mörner - not always correct...

    http://www.vof.se/folkvett/ar-1997/nr-3-4/klockan-som-slagruta/
    err, unless I am seriously missing something, your link appears to be written in some non-English language.
  9. 27 May '17 18:34
    Originally posted by humy
    err, unless I am seriously missing something, your link appears to be written in some non-English language.
    http://www.vof.se/utmarkelser/tidigare-utmarkelser/arets-forvillare-1995/
    In rough translation:
    He won the 'misleader of the Year' award in 1995.
  10. 27 May '17 19:48 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by humy
    err, unless I am seriously missing something, your link appears to be written in some non-English language.
    Yes, it's Swedish. He is Swedish. Google Translate will give you a clue.
    He believes in some strange things. So I wouldn't trust him too much.
  11. 01 Jun '17 19:15
    Originally posted by humy
    1, I am not aware of anyone, let alone a climate scientist, saying that sea level rise is currently occurring at an 'alarming rate". I am not implying such a person doesn't exists but rather such people must be a relative rarity and certainly not what we would call 'the norm'.

    2, your question is a totally stupid one to post in a SCIENCE forum since "alarmin ...[text shortened]... define the 'amount of' emotion of "alarm" so we can then say, as you asked, "...by how much"
    "2, your question is a totally stupid one to post in a SCIENCE forum since "alarming" (anything) isn't a scientific term or scientific quantity but rather is an emotional response."

    You have used the term "denier" many times. Is that a scientific term that is not an emotional response?
  12. 01 Jun '17 19:19
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    How alarming sea level rise is, depends very much on where you live. Although I live near the sea in Cape Town, I am not yet alarmed personally. I am certainly concerned about the long term though.

    But sea level rise is only one aspect of global warming. An glacier melt rates is probably not the smartest way to measure temperatures. We have thermometers, and satellites for that.
    Thermometers are often put in cities and airports that are "heat islands". Not the smartest way to measure temperatures. I think sea levels are the best way to gauge how much warming is actually taking place.
  13. 01 Jun '17 19:22
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Yes, it's Swedish. He is Swedish. Google Translate will give you a clue.
    He believes in some strange things. So I wouldn't trust him too much.
    Expecting English speaking people to translate Swedish is not the smartest way to convince us you have a point.
  14. 01 Jun '17 19:26
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    Thermometers are often put in cities and airports that are "heat islands". Not the smartest way to measure temperatures. I think sea levels are the best way to gauge how much warming is actually taking place.
    Do you really think scientists in climatology measure temperatures in cities and airports? Don't you think there are thermometers in more isolated places? Don't you think there are many methods to measure temperatures? Don't you think they calibrate their methods to avoid these heat islands?
  15. 01 Jun '17 19:30
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_level_rise
    Wikipedia is not a reliable source of information, although the graph on the wiki link you posted shows a steady rise with no alarming increase at all for over 100 years.