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Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    27 Jun '15 14:47
    http://phys.org/news/2015-06-universe-crystal-glass.html

    So far they have detected 7 'rings' in the 13.7 billion years the universe has been around. So a frequency of 2 billion odd years per oscillation but variable.
  2. 28 Jun '15 09:10
    From the article:
    "A new form of matter, dark energy, repulsive in nature, ...."
    Although I guess we can call photons 'matter', it gets a little confusing when you have 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' and then call the 'dark energy' a form of matter.

    My understanding is that if they are correct about the universe ringing, then it might remove the need for dark energy, and would also have implications for the long term future of the universe (big crunch rather than continuous expansion).
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    28 Jun '15 21:56
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    From the article:
    "A new form of matter, dark energy, repulsive in nature, ...."
    Although I guess we can call photons 'matter', it gets a little confusing when you have 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' and then call the 'dark energy' a form of matter.

    My understanding is that if they are correct about the universe ringing, then it might remove the nee ...[text shortened]... ications for the long term future of the universe (big crunch rather than continuous expansion).
    We will all know within a couple billion years
  4. 29 Jun '15 21:37
    does it have anything to do with vibrating strings?
  5. 30 Jun '15 07:13 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    We will all know within a couple billion years
    We should know before that. We should be able to see density waves in the large structure of the universe.
  6. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    30 Jun '15 13:56
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    We should know before that. We should be able to see density waves in the large structure of the universe.
    Yeah, that might be obvious in a mere one million years, eh.
  7. 30 Jun '15 15:06
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Yeah, that might be obvious in a mere one million years, eh.
    No, it should be obvious in the next 10 years or so as we continue to map the universe.
  8. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    30 Jun '15 16:08
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    No, it should be obvious in the next 10 years or so as we continue to map the universe.
    You are talking about the continued improvements in the mapping of the cosmic background?
  9. 30 Jun '15 20:36 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    You are talking about the continued improvements in the mapping of the cosmic background?
    No. Improvements in the mapping of the locations of galaxies. Distance is determined at least in part by redshift which is a function of expansion. If the expansion is not uniform, but galaxy distribution is, then the map we get based on the assumption of uniform expansion will show density waves in the galaxy distributions.

    We should also find discrepancies between redshift distance and other methods of measuring distance.
  10. 02 Jul '15 20:24
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    My understanding is that if they are correct about the universe ringing, then it might remove the need for dark energy, and would also have implications for the long term future of the universe (big crunch rather than continuous expansion).
    Your hypothesis supports my ideas about dark energy and the fate of the universe. :-)
  11. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    06 Jul '15 17:59
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Your hypothesis supports my ideas about dark energy and the fate of the universe. :-)
    Like this theory, or proposition: The big rip.

    http://phys.org/news/2015-06-cosmic-stickiness-favors-big-rip.html
  12. 06 Jul '15 18:10
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Like this theory, or proposition: The big rip.

    http://phys.org/news/2015-06-cosmic-stickiness-favors-big-rip.html
    Well, I'm not so sure about that... :/
  13. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    14 Jul '15 13:41
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Well, I'm not so sure about that... :/
    That would kind of suck wouldn't it!
  14. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    18 Jul '15 21:11
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    From the article:
    "A new form of matter, dark energy, repulsive in nature, ...."
    Although I guess we can call photons 'matter', it gets a little confusing when you have 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' and then call the 'dark energy' a form of matter.

    My understanding is that if they are correct about the universe ringing, then it might remove the nee ...[text shortened]... ications for the long term future of the universe (big crunch rather than continuous expansion).
    I think physicists are just running out of ideas.
  15. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    19 Jul '15 01:06
    Originally posted by Soothfast
    I think physicists are just running out of ideas.
    They always have ideas, you can count on that. Proving them is another thing entirely.